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Why Pride is Good

prideI don’t like to brag, in fact, I hate it. Humility is a much better virtue to have than pride but sometimes we can forget the things we’ve done.

Sometimes we can forget all of the amazing things we’ve accomplished simply because we’re so focused on the next big thing.

We all have goals, we all have an image of what we want our lives to be like and so many times we think doing the next big thing will get us to where we’ve wanted to be. Most times that isn’t true. Sure we have another notch on our resume but we’re still no closer to a house in the mountains, a happy and fulfilling relationship and the notion of living happily ever after.

At times like these it’s important to remember what you’ve done. It’s important to focus on gratitude for the places life has already taken you because without those you may as well be nowhere.

One big milestone for me was being published in the New York Times. I thought at the time that that would guarantee fame and fortune and forever cement me as a serious writer. Sure there was fanfare from friends and family and the article was shared something like a thousand times on Facebook but after all of that ended, I found myself still, essentially, in the same boat I was before so I set my sights higher.

The thing is, I didn’t take more than a day or so at most to reflect on how big of an achievement that was. It’s safe to say that only a very small subset of people get published in The New York Times and that fact didn’t even hit me.

The point is, I should be proud of the amazing things I’ve done as should you.

Sure pride is one of the seven deadly sins but not if you take it in moderation. I can guarantee that there are things you’ve done in your life that only a small handful of people ever achieve. It’s important to be conscious of that. It’s important to realize that you’ve made an impact in the world whether you like it or not.

The things you’ve done may be small but to the people around you they mean the world.

For the longest time I wanted to be immortalized through my work, I wanted to have something I created be around for long after I was gone, so I wrote a book. Sure it’s a tangible thing to remember me by but the way you make people feel will stick with them for much longer than something you create.

Essentially, you have to proud of yourself. You have to be proud that you’ve made an impact on people no matter how small that group is.

As a person with schizophrenia I know how hard it can be to feel like you matter to the world. After a major diagnosis like that you feel like part of the trash, you feel like a reject from society because you’ll never be normal.

There are still people that care about you though, there are still things you do in your life that have an impact on people, and you may not realize it, but you can be sure that the idea of what you’ve done will stick with them.

Be proud of that, even if you don’t think you’ve done anything significant, you have made an impact on people and that’s more worthy of praise than being published in the New York Times.

You’re good, don’t worry.

Why Pride is Good

Michael Hedrick

Michael Hedrick is a writer and photographer who has lived with schizophrenia since he was 20. His work has been featured in Salon, The Week, Scientific American and The New York Times. You can purchase his book 'Connections' here or Follow his blog on Living with Schizophrenia here.


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APA Reference
Hedrick, M. (2015). Why Pride is Good. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 22, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/two-minds/2015/06/why-pride-is-good/

 

Last updated: 21 Jun 2015
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.