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How to Make Your Frustrations Easier

frustrationWe all struggle for something. We all wish certain things were different in our lives. We all cling to the hope that someday things will be different.

Whether it’s the issue of making a living, finding love or having a fulfilling career, we all have that thing we wish we could change.

For me, my main struggle is making a living.

As a person with schizophrenia I also struggle with the fact that the things that come easy to other people are incredibly hard for me. I have this sinking feeling in my gut a lot of the time that to be able to be financially stable I have to do things which are going to exacerbate my symptoms, cause me a good deal of stress and possibly make me sicker than I am.

After nine years of hard work to find a relative stability, falling backward would not be a good thing.

All that said and done I’ve had to figure out a way to be comfortable with my life as it is right now. That includes the fact that I rely on government assistance for housing, food, healthcare and that I still manage to go into debt every month.

The first thing to remember is that it takes time for anything to happen. This is not to say that just hope and time brings money, what I mean is that with hard work and some time things will eventually open up. It just takes a while. You have to be comfortable knowing that no matter how bad it seems right now, if you just keep plugging away eventually something has to break. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t still in limbo with that one but so far I’ve seen the benefit of being patient. Being patient means accepting your circumstances and trying to find the little good nuggets about your situation. Focusing on those definitely makes it easier.

The next thing to know is that you can’t focus on how things are and where you want to be constantly. Find a distraction, a hobby, some creative thing you can spend your days focusing on so you aren’t constantly thinking about how you wish things were different. For me these distractions are photography and making music, it gives me peace to lose myself in those pursuits and the good part about it is that if you get good enough at your hobby there may be a future in it for you.

Lastly, you need people in your life. You need a sounding board to get the struggle off your chest, if just to moan for hours about why it’s so hard a friend, parent, sibling or partner will give you comfort simply by being there for you. Letting you let go of your frustrations with a non-judgmental ear. Having a person to go to can make even the worst problems disintegrate.

Usually the problem is much worse in your head and letting it out and giving it air can take the mental pressure off.

In summation, it’s important to work hard and be patient, it’s important to accept your circumstances, it’s important to have distractions and it’s important to have someone you can talk to. With all of these things even the worst problems aren’t that bad. Using all of them can your mind up from frustration which is more than necessary if you have a mental illness.

How to Make Your Frustrations Easier


Michael Hedrick

Michael Hedrick is a writer and photographer who has lived with schizophrenia since he was 20. His work has been featured in Salon, The Week, Scientific American and The New York Times. You can purchase his book 'Connections' here or Follow his blog on Living with Schizophrenia here.


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APA Reference
Hedrick, M. (2015). How to Make Your Frustrations Easier. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 22, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/two-minds/2015/03/how-to-make-your-frustrations-easier/

 

Last updated: 7 Mar 2015
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.