33 thoughts on “How To Spot A Narcissist On Facebook

  • November 17, 2013 at 1:04 pm

    Unfortunately, I think this is less about “how to spot a narcissist” and more about how to write an article when you’re envious of another person.

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    • July 29, 2016 at 12:45 pm

      Spoken like a true narcissist.

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  • November 19, 2013 at 7:00 pm

    I didn’t see the rating that would indicate if a person is mildly, average or most extreme narcissist.
    I have one of those traits, but mostly it’s about time to post, which is scarce.

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  • November 22, 2013 at 9:07 pm

    Great article… it sounds exactly right to me (I always thought FB fed narcissism, and it is why I quit it!)

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    • August 8, 2015 at 1:16 am

      This is just one of many Great articles on the topic of people who can’t live without FB.
      Something that has always been obvious to me and I refused to ever use it.
      Want to find out who not to genuinely trust? Find out how much they rely on FB and Twitter. Gives the wrong ones a voice in a world where everyone seems to be hearing voices which is exactly the problem.

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  • July 29, 2014 at 1:36 pm

    My ex was narcissistic his Facebook is plastered with s*utty women. That’s all his friends.

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  • September 18, 2014 at 1:06 am

    Cerene sounds like a narcissist. ; -)
    Excellent article- Facilebook is like Narcissist Anonymous, but it’s all about narcissists, so it isn’t anonymous! haha

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  • October 8, 2014 at 10:45 pm

    Interesting article!
    IMHO the problem with pinpointing a narcissist on Fb is that there’s so many people that use it as a place to vent, say and react negatively to things, and to post pictures of themselves which usually tend to be more flattering (or maybe seductive depending on what your standard of “seductive” looks like). I mean, who would intentionally want an unfortunate/bad profile picture of themselves to be shared with the world? Unless it’s for irony’s-sake…
    Basically, I know a whole lot of people that would appear to be ~narcissists~ whilst on Facebook but in real life and offline are most certainly are not narcissists in the least! Perhaps we need to take into account what their default posting practices are and what they tend to use their Fb account for…Back in 2006-08 before it became the complete monstrosity that it is now, a lot of people (mostly college-age students and the like) used it to rant about their feelings, emotions, problems, share cool experiences and the best party pictures to one-up each other, etc. Obviously, Fb felt like a safe haven to express oneself or opinion with others (usually just IRL friends) which they normally wouldn’t otherwise do in the real world. I know I was one of those people, definitely! However, Fb is a totally different place now so the seemingly “FB narcissists” by today’s standards weren’t back then and now are quite silent and weary of sharing almost anything about themselves on Facebook. So, an Fb Narcissist does not necessarily equate to being a narcissist in the real world. It would also be better if the author could’ve discussed the different levels of narcissism here, as I’m sure a lot of people will find that they fit into at least one of the traits listed above.
    Thanks for the write-up and I’m glad to have found it — nevermind the fact that I’m a year late. Thank you!

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    • March 2, 2017 at 12:17 pm

      Agreed. I don’t hardly think to thumbs up every post I like, and have a tendency to post things that I personally feel are inspiring to uplift people. I have tons of people on my fb for two reasons..a business I was trying to promote at time and the fact that many employers are now judging whether or not you are a people person by fb connections. I hardly ever give my full two cents on fb, because my real friends talk to me in person. I am also open to making new connections. So, the things I say are not to highlight how wonderful and great I am, but to reach out to like-minded individuals and maybe just a little narcissistic tendency to feel like my thoughts and feelings being put out there might make another person think, and cause little changes that could have positive affects, that could cause a butterfly effect. Sometimes I join in to vent and bitch, but I’m overly aware of what I put out to the world. I put out what I want to come back basically.. I usually just chat with an online group about a lot of things my real life friends find to be dull or weird.

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  • October 20, 2014 at 8:53 pm

    Number 2 is almost right, I would think from my experience how it was worded that would mean everyone on my fb is narcissistic. I know that isn’t your intent that everyone who likes and comments is automatic narcissistic, but more or less you are right, just if it’s like habitual and it’s meant to for the individual for attention seeking as in it does no good for others except to boost their own self big “EGO” yes.

    Like if you see them liking everyone’s comments and commenting back, when it comes to compliments to them. Also constantly commenting on everyone’s statuses getting in everyone’s business intentionally trying to make it about them directing the conversation away from the other person’s post to the person whose ego is out of the proportion of their eyesight of mindfulness of others.

    I think you got it spot on. Just thought I add to number 2 it was a bit vague.

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  • November 2, 2014 at 2:05 pm

    This is ridiculous, scaremongering crap probably written by an old person. For some people, like me, as a child the internet was my only means of socalisation, as I had no friends and I can say if the internet hadn’t been there, I probably wouldn’t be here now. It really is a lifesaver for some people and I have met some of my best real life friends through the internet over the years. Get over your technophobia. Plus those “narcissism” traits just sounds pretty normal to me. Ridiculous article I think.

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    • March 30, 2015 at 12:26 am

      Technophobia???? Sorry, I didn’t detect any technophobia in this piece, Helena, and this is not a ridiculous article. It’s pretty easy to throw a big word like that around, but its totally out of context here. This piece is an honest appraisal of narcissism on FB and how the author can spot the extremists. The author pretty much states how we are all (at some degree) narcissistic, but consider these clues on how to spot the heavy purveyors of narcissism on FB. It’s great that you have found many friendships on the Internet, but that’s not what this article is about. Get over your problem with honest critiques and read this piece more carefully. See the issue addressed for what it truly is. Maybe you’ll even find even more good friends!

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      • April 25, 2015 at 11:34 am

        If we are all narcissists to some degree the term loses all meaning, doesn’t it? That’s basically the same as saying all people are individuals: this is true but hardly worthwhile information.

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  • December 24, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    How often does a narcissist fake modesty and humility? Bragging about times he let strangers go ahead of him just bc he’s so nice. Pretending to not care about those who are rich and just liking nice people. Too many compliments too. Could be partly an attention whore and then narcissim?
    He does this a lot at work to get noticed by women too. Maybe just very insecure?

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    • July 29, 2016 at 12:47 pm

      How often? Always. Always. Always.

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  • December 27, 2014 at 4:14 pm

    I’m suspicious of regular people on Facebook with around 1000 “friends”.

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  • February 12, 2015 at 10:49 pm

    While Facebook may attract narcissists to flaunt their ego, it doesn’t always mean that there aren’t others out there with the same disorder who remain lurking in this avenue. I’ve been raised by narcissistic parents, and one of them has a Facebook but uses it only to read what others have to say (or rather, to keep track of those who are in her control, in this case her daughters). Offline, it’s another story of course.

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  • February 21, 2015 at 12:20 am

    I’m an X gen, and most of my friendships, have been in person. I used my Facebook account up for causes, to learn about languages, since they have lessons on Facebook.

    I witnessed an online friend from 15 years ago, tern into a narcissist before my eyes. She flaunts her relationship with this guy, who everyone knows is just playing her. They take up most of her Facebook page, she ignores comments from others and won’t answer them. She only writes chat/ messages about her relationship. A friend’s father died and she told this idiot about what happened, and the email is all about new boyfriend. I can’t imagine someone being so inconsiderate, as to not even say these few words ” sorry to hear about your father”. My friend got an email back about how “wonderful” the new man in her life is. Nothing about my friend’s dad having passed away.

    Her entire Facebook is all selfies, nothing else, everything is about her.

    I for once, figured out what she really is and I no longer want to put up with it.

    If anyone thinks it’s cute to be a self centered brat, that’s their problem, but shallow people don’t make much of a splash in real heart felt deep meaningful life.

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  • April 10, 2015 at 9:18 am

    Interesting article. It was spot on for a friend of mine who I have long suspected to be narcissistic. She’s fairly harmless though. But for the malignant narcissist in my life it would prove useless – he largely avoids facebook.

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  • April 12, 2015 at 5:24 pm

    And this is why I deleted my Facebook, it’s corrupt.

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  • May 22, 2015 at 2:36 am

    Or they certianly do not like this article and try to avoid it and they will not even knock its credibility if they know what they will appear to look like!

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  • May 27, 2015 at 11:04 pm

    My clue was a bit more subtle than that (although this person had maxed out the number of ‘friends’ — there weren’t a bunch of selfies, though). It was the apparent need to stir the pot and create drama if things got a little too quiet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what *kind* of attention they get.

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  • June 28, 2015 at 11:11 pm

    I would think the ones that have a HUGE amount of FB friends are a big clue, yes! One I know has thousands of FB friends, it seems like, although he has always lived in small towns.

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  • April 26, 2016 at 2:09 pm

    I deleted my account about 5 months ago and never once looked back. It was so liberating! I got sick of seeing the vague fishing for attention and people calling other people out without saying names…the drama!!! You never get the full story on Facebook. Mostly what you get are happy times and a false perception of others’ real lives. I became more and more afraid to share anything about my life because my ex was trying to stalk me through my family – keeping tabs on me through them – who kept tabs on me through Facebook. I think oversharing is kind of “faddish”, and will start to dip over the next few years once people realize not nearly as many people care about their lives as they do.

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  • June 24, 2016 at 11:48 am

    I think this is only really true for grandiose narcissists. My narcX was a vulnerable covert type and as such none of the above really applies to him. He did everything he could to appear giving and humble and often complimented people on Facebook. Everyone thinks he’s wonderful and supportive and his true face only shows in intimate relationships.

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    • March 20, 2019 at 4:46 pm

      Can you please elaborate when you said:
      Everyone thinks he’s wonderful and supportive and his true face only shows in intimate relationships. Thank you

      Reply
  • July 29, 2016 at 3:59 pm

    Guys there’s a very easy solution which i have tried, I feel much more relieved after I did this. I had about maybe 100 friends (which I never even talked to) simplest thing to do is delete them and keep the ones close to you. I dropped down to about 30 friends but I do not have any narcasasists on my Facebook anymore. just people that I care about and vice versa

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  • May 17, 2017 at 11:31 am

    Lol! This is exactly why I quit social media over a year ago! To many narcissist and yes this article sounds quite on point, if you are a confident person there is no need to seek attention and praises from total strangers, get a self esteem and some self love then you won’t need to depend on social media.
    This society continues to become desensitized because of social media, this is why we get off when we watch FB live crimes take place, and we think that someone commiting the act of rape or suicide on FB is a normal behavior; FB/ social media narcissist are a sad new breed of beings.

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  • May 17, 2017 at 11:32 am

    Lol! This is exactly why I quit social media over a year ago! To many narcissist and yes this article sounds quite on point, if you are a confident person there is no need to seek attention and praises from total strangers, get a self esteem and some self love then you won’t need to depend on social media.
    This society continues to become desensitized because of social media, this is why we get off when we watch FB live crimes take place, and we think that someone commiting the act of rape or suicide on FB is a normal behavior; FB/ social media narcissist are a sad new breed of beings.

    Reply
  • February 15, 2018 at 1:49 am

    I believe most admins of fb groups are narcissists. They love bomb new members and mercilessly abuse people who disagree with them and they spend a lot of unpaid time controling sizable groups, but they are devoted to the group because it is their own personal audience and supply. I’ve noticed that their group rules are usually extensive, laying out threatening consequences for breaking rules.

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  • March 18, 2019 at 6:32 am

    I think the selfie brigade are very narcissistic. A new photo comes up nearly every 2nd day. It is usually with a pout [if a woman] and very ‘posed’, it will most likely be airbrushed as this is easy to do now. There will be a photo of the restaurant, coffee shop, holiday spot and what they had to eat [a photo of ]. Narcissists on facebook live their lives as if they were Wannabees, Celebs, Kardashians, and I guess in their own heads they are.
    Possibly the saddest thing is the pose [regular] and the hundreds of likes and also ‘your a beautiful ‘ Narcissistic supply on tap.

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  • June 27, 2019 at 12:34 pm

    It’s easy to spot a narcissist on facebook.

    Look at the left side bar and see how long their self-made list of ‘accomplishments’ is.

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