In A Wise Approach To Taking In The News PsychCentral blogger Elisha Goldstein writes: The global political climate right now is very sensitive and all we need is a little spark to get our nervous systems activated. He also suggests if we experience a positive or negative reaction to the news, we research the article before sharing it.

In NYC, what we’ve seen is a tendency towards feeling negative about the news in general, and a palpable lack of hopefulness. But this isn’t just right now. It’s been going on for nearly as long as we can remember, years, even decades. Perhaps it’s that New York attitude. So we suggest that if the news makes you feel positive, keep on reading it and don’t be too shy about sharing it. Here are six positive tidbits to get you started:

TELEGRAPH: We reflexively think that our brain controls our body. But our body affects our brain, too. It seems there is now evidence that improving your posture can make you feel less depressed. And exercise appears to prevent depression in children. (Read more about this at PsychCentral.)We know that smiling actually leads to feeling happier, too.  So stand up straight. Take your kids for a walk. And smile.

WSJ: Evidence is still mounting of the importance of a healthy diet as part of a treatment plan for depression. The diet in the study is the Mediterranean Diet, which many enjoy.

CNBC: Looking for work? You might be in luck. Private companies in January hired 246,000 new workers, an  incredible and unexpected vote of confidence in the economy. Manufacturing, construction, and other goods-producing jobs as opposed to low-pay, low-skill service jobs led the way.

CNN: It is difficult to imagine the social isolation locked-in patients feel.  New technology can help these patients (a locked-in patient is someone who has brain function but complete paralysis, which can be caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury, medication overdose or diseases of the circulatory or nervous system, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.) It is possible they soon will be able to communicate with family and doctors.

C-SPAN: Need a place to stay while you’re in recovery from addiction? A comfortable home is so important for everyone, especially those in recovery from mental illness or addiction. Recently, Dr. Ben Carson, the Secretary of HUD, (during the HUD hearings), recognized the importance of decent housing for those in recovery from addiction. Having a HUD secretary who grew up in poverty and understands how poor housing and poverty negatively affects a person’s emotional, physical, and spiritual health will offer hope to the millions of Americans struggling with the same issues.

TECH-TIMES: It takes just a few minutes a day…Mindfulness meditation really does cut stress and help anxiety, a new clinical study by the National Institute of Health shows. Real and measurable results were achieved in this study. Prayer also achieves long-lasting benefits for anxiety and depression, this study, this one, and others show (as long as the person praying has faith, some researchers show).