maxresdefaultIn this presidential election, character probably counts at least as much as the issues do. But with an election that could likely change the course of this nation, we must remember that whoever moves into the White House in 2017, will be determining:  How politicians in Washington will spend our tax dollars. 

Specifically for PsychCentral readers, bloggers, and columnists, we want to think about how politicians in Washington will spend our tax dollars on mental health. Questions we have include:

Mental Health Policy: How much of your money would you like to see allocated for mental health p0licy? (And how much should be spent on the bureaucratic agencies that need to be in place to implement these policies?) How should mental health policy be developed? What kinds of experts should be involved in advising on policy?

Mental Health Care: How much for mental health care, treatment? Should the government be involved in health care, and specifically mental health care? In what capacity? Who should be making care decisions? Should tax dollars be used for treatment through state allocations or through a monolithic federal program?

Mental Health Research: What about spending for mental health research? Is the research currently being funded useful, meaningful? Are the results accurate? Should non-academics receive funding for research?

Note: As we ask ourselves these questions, we need to think about government’s larger role in our lives; the future of policies the next administration puts in place; who will be running the agencies and programs not just now, but after future elections (we might like a policy when someone we agree with runs the country, but what happens when someone we disagree with comes into power?); how much personal information we want the government to have access to/control over (especially as this concerns health care and mental health care); how effectively the government will use the money they take from us/what’s the wastefulness track-record; and more.