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Stress, Depression, & The Bacteria In Your Gut

We’ve blogged about the Brain-Gut and it’s relation to the Austism spectrum disorders; now the “microbiome”, a term coined by an American molecular biologist, which means “the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms that literally share our body space” is the trending way to describe the relational system that may have an impact on virtually every facet of our mental and physical being.

In this fascinating video, Professor John F. Cryan’s of University College Cork (Ireland), whose current research interests include the neurobiological basis of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety and drug dependence as well as a focus on understanding the interaction between brain, gut & microbiome and how it applies to stress and immune-related disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome and obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, has been asking a provocative question lately: Does our microbiome (the varied microflora in our gut) govern our behavior and sensitivity to stress?

His answer may surprise you.

Stress, Depression, & The Bacteria In Your Gut


Richard Zwolinski, LMHC, CASAC & C.R. Zwolinski

Richard Zwolinski, LMHC, CASAC is the author of Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better, and Move On Without Wasting Time or Money and is licensed in addiction and psychotherapy with over 25 years experience as well as a consultant to organizations and companies in the fields of mental health and addiction. He is the executive director of an outpatient behavioral health program. Learn more about Richard here.


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APA Reference
& C.R. Zwolinski, R. (2014). Stress, Depression, & The Bacteria In Your Gut. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 21, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/therapy-soup/2014/12/stress-depression-the-bacteria-in-your-gut/

 

Last updated: 30 Dec 2014
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