8 thoughts on “10 Things No One Ever Tells You about the Children of Single Parents

  • October 28, 2011 at 11:21 am

    Very interesting and helpful information on an important topic. Since single parent households are becoming almost as common as traditional families, it is important that we understand them and how to help them.

    Boyd Lemon-Author of “Digging Deep: A Writer Uncovers His Marriages,” a memoir of the author’s journey to understand his role in the destruction of his three marriages, helpful for anyone to deal with issues in their own relationships. Information, excerpts and reviews: http://www.BoydLemon-Writer.com.

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  • November 2, 2011 at 12:04 pm

    “5.7% for the children of single mothers, compared to 4.5% for the children of married parents. That’s a difference of just a tad more than 1%.”

    ACTUALLY, THAT’S A DIFFERENCE OF 26%. IN OTHER WORDS, ASSUMING THAT THE QUOTED DATA HAS ANY VALIDITY, CHILDREN OF SINGLE MOTHERS ARE 26% MORE LIKELY TO ABUSE DRUGS AND ALCOHOL.

    IN ANY CASE, THE POINT IS NOT TO EITHER CONDEMN OR ENDORSE SINGLE MOTHERHOOD, NOR TO WRITE OFF THE CHILDREN AS DOOMED. IT’S JUST THAT SINGLE MOTHERS, AND THEIR SUPPORT NETWORKS, NEED TO BE AWARE OF THE SOMEWHAT HIGHER LIKELIHOOD of substance abuse issues.

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    • November 4, 2011 at 3:08 pm

      So if single mothers know the numbers about 5.7 vs 4.5, they will treat their kids differently? I hope what they would take from knowing the numbers is that all of the damning of the children of single parents is on very shaky grounds.

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  • November 2, 2011 at 4:51 pm

    Re: the rate of adolescent abuse, ” 5.7% for the children of single mothers, compared to 4.5% for the children of married parents. That’s a difference of just a tad more than 1%.”

    Stating it’s “just a tad more than 1%” implies little difference between the 2 groups, when there is actually a large difference between them (>20%).

    If the rates had been 2% compared to 4%, you wouldn’t say there is a 2% difference, but rather twice as many children of singles compared to marrieds.

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    • November 4, 2011 at 3:06 pm

      YOU might say that twice as many had problems, but _I_ would not. One of the points I am making here is that the pro-marriage types will make claims such as, “twice as many…” WITHOUT showing you the actual data. When people read “twice as many,” I bet my autographed Mickey Mantle baseball glove that they do not think the numbers are 2% and 4%. Readers should be able to see what the actual rates are, when they are available. That’s what I’m showing here.

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  • July 17, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    You mentioned that children with disadvantages started having them before their parents were divorced. That begs the question, Are their problems due to the instability that ultimately led to divorce? I am a single mother, and as much as I want to believe that my child is better off because of it, Fathers are needed.

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  • July 17, 2013 at 12:32 pm

    I’d be interested to know, what percentage of these children are able to maintain a healthy relationship with both parents, following divorce. That is a major factor you seldom hear about.

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  • September 8, 2013 at 10:19 am

    First when me read single mom children are at more
    risk, i got shattered.
    But later realized I grew up in family with fighting parents and siblings not supportive. Which caused lot damage to me.

    No one who meets my son ,will feel he has single
    parent. he is full of life and studies he excels.

    root cause for kids going wrong way is not whether
    they have single parent or both

    problem is when they dont get the warmth of love.
    A hand to hold them when they need. Security blanket which tells them they are safe…

    The article which stated single parents kids are doomed are wrong , actually such rude remarks
    make happy people sad .

    single parents need to work extra mile, but they will have no complaints as they love their kids lots.

    Reply
 

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