Archives for March, 2012

Love & Affection

Part 2: What Does It Mean to Live with Your Parents in Your 20s or 30s?

Welcome to Part 2 of the two-part series on the meaning of the international trend toward more adult children living with their parents. I have been generating questions and answers based on my reading of Katherine Newman’s new book, The accordion family: Boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition, and the recent Pew report on the same topic. Part 1 is here.

Even in difficult economic...
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Love & Affection

What Does It Mean to Live with Your Parents in Your 20s or 30s? Part 1

When I was in college and then in graduate school, there was consensus among my peers on the topic of living with your parents – it wasn’t done. I finished grad school in 1979, so the tumult of the 60s, with the war protests and the women’s movement and civil rights advocacy and the counterculture, was very much a part of the sensibility of my times.

What I had not known until yesterday,...
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Love & Affection

What Is the Ultimate Commitment?

A few days ago, a Toronto newspaper printed an amazing in-depth story about a 55-year old single woman who is in no way a celebrity or a public figure. When I printed it in a tiny font, it came to six pages.

The single woman profiled in the story, Shelagh Gordon, is no longer with us. She died suddenly of a brain aneurysm. A reporter from the paper saw the obituary and...
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Love & Affection

A Rant About A Rant About Marriage: Part 2

In my previous post, The Topic that Turns Smart, Creative People into Mindless Spouters of Clichés: Part 1, I quoted from Toure’s ode to marriage in the “daily rant” feature of the Dylan Ratigan Show. Go ahead and read that first part, so you will have in mind the context for this post.

Here in Part 2, I will review just a few of the problems with Toure’s platitudes.

Let’s start with the...
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Love & Affection

The Topic that Turns Smart, Creative People into Mindless Spouters of Clichés: Part 1

Suppose I challenged you to write the most cliché-drenched ode to marriage you could possibly imagine. Don’t do any critical thinking. Don’t worry about whether what you have to say is true, or logically consistent, or whether it could be potentially offensive to millions, or whether it might serve as the basis for a women’s studies essay on cultural criticism or a Saturday Night Live skit. Just pour it on thick.

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Marriage

Part 2: If You Marry, Will You Be Less Depressed?

Part 1 of this two-part article was about studies which compare the depression levels, at just one point in time, of people who are currently married, divorced, widowed, or had always been single. The studies show that the currently married and the always-single have similarly low levels of depression, whereas the previously married (divorced and widowed) tend to report more depression.

Because we do not know how depressed the various people were before...
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