15 thoughts on “100,000-Person Study Shows That Your Psych Meds Can Kill You

  • April 15, 2014 at 9:16 am

    In his book, Anatomy of an Epidemic – Robert Whitaker outlines the dangers and catastrophic global issues with these and other psychotropic drugs.

    Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 8:56 am

    Meditation and yoga techniques could be a good option in treatment of depressive disorders like anxiety.

    Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 11:07 am

    The more these drugs are prescribed, the more people view them as “no big deal.” But, as is outlined in this article, they are a HUGE deal, and hold very real dangers.

    Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 11:15 am

    All very interesting and unfortunately no doubt true. However for the millions that are affected in one way or another by mental illness-what other EFFECTIVE options are there? No-one WANTS to take these things, but often the effect of not taking them can be as dangerous, or worse, as taking them. Life’s a compromise unfortunately. It doesn’t help to take people struggling with mental illness on yet another guilt trip.
    No medication is safe-it’s all about advantages/disadvantages- I don’t see cancer patients being bombarded with articles about the toxicity of chemo-drugs, and rightly so-you do what you have to do.

    Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 1:57 pm

    All mass killers are under some kind of Psych prescription drugs. Does it ring the bell now? Medical professionals need to talk about this.

    Reply
    • April 17, 2014 at 2:16 am

      Not true, many of these killers were not under any sort of psychiatric care medical or therapy.

      Reply
    • April 17, 2014 at 10:01 am

      “All mass killers are under some kind of Psych prescription drugs.”

      Even if this ridiculous generalization were true it would still miss the obvious. People on psych meds have mental illness!
      The meds do not tell people to pick up an assault rifle and choose victims. In fact they go a long way toward stopping those voices and preventing mass killings.
      Meds are by no means a perfect solution to mental illness but they do help many struggling people to get through one more day. Their vilification simply adds to the stigma of receiving treatment.

      Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 2:14 pm

    I’ve known this for a long time. This includes not just benzos, opiates, etc. either.

    How about lithium poisoning? And deaths related to it? Shall I continue? I don’t think I need to.

    I’d rather take the meds and be relatively balanced and maybe have a somewhat shorter lifespan, than NOT to and be dead.

    Reply
  • April 16, 2014 at 10:27 pm

    The real problem is that drug treatment is evolving as the preferred model–psychiatrists for the most part are only interested in diagnosing patients in order to prescribe medication, not to provide analysis or behavioral therapy. Visits are less than 1/2 hour– 20 minutes seems to be the norm. With that as the prevalent method for diagnosis and treatment, it is more than ever an uphill battle to find treatment that does not involve medication. Even therapists and counselors assume that part of the behavioral therapies they provide will be augmented by medications. It is very, very hard to avoid a pharmaceutical approach– I don’t think the tide can be turned.

    Reply
    • October 16, 2014 at 3:02 pm

      I share your perceptions and conclusions. I dont agree that a 20-minute appt is enough time to accurately perscribe a potentially dangerous chemical for a patient.

      As we learn more about Neuroplasticity and as well-funded studies done by sports medicine tell is more about Brain Trauma, the model of the arrogant assessment ending in the scrawled drug order is unsupportable.

      It’s my view that anyone with any history of head trauma, including childhood accidents and Domestic Violence, should be screened for brain trauma before any drugs are introduced. My own experience with presenting this wish to a pDoc, was an arrogant dismissal of the idea. I’ll be seeing a qualified Neurologist next week, thank you.

      Reply
  • April 17, 2014 at 2:18 am

    I would like to know ‘what’ caused the deaths of the persons who died sooner. How old were they in comparison to the other group? What was the male/female ratio? These things are important.

    Reply
  • April 17, 2014 at 9:40 am

    And what about the drug companies? These drugs are a multimillion dollar industry. I have heard many clients complain that they feel like their doctor is just yhrowing “meds” at the problem, or a MD saying “lets try adding _____”. A pill does not make grief or trauma go away. We are a nation of people intolerant of sitting with and feeling our feelings and want a quick fix.

    Reply
  • April 17, 2014 at 11:34 am

    I don’t see how this study could have any validity. Comparing people with a mental illness, and those without is ridiculous. People are so quick to jump on the bandwagon to knock psych meds. They never think in terms of the lives they save. Let us see a study on insulin and diabetic’s, the numbers would be 6 times these.

    Reply
  • April 17, 2014 at 11:41 am

    I don’t see how this study could have any validity. Comparing people with a mental illness, and those without is ridiculous. People are so quick to jump on the bandwagon to knock psych meds. They never think in terms of the lives they save. Let us see a study on insulin and diabetic’s, the numbers would be 6 times these. As far as violence, I don’t know anyone who committed a violent crime, who is on psych meds. I know the lawyers like the defense.

    Reply
  • April 17, 2014 at 12:01 pm

    Agreed for the most part on the other comments. I believe I am addicted to benzos, and have been for many years, but will not go junkie on myself, and take more than prescribed for a day. Instead, I take some seroquel that’s calming, gets rid of the clonazepam craving, and doesn’t make me sleepy at all. Don’t know if I could go off the benzos though, my shrink for meds has been the same for 20yrs.
    I do think lithium is outright poisoning and not monitored enough, takes a lot of effort for upkeep, then has bad side effects.

    Reply
 

Join the Conversation!

We invite you to share your thoughts and tell us what you think in this public forum. Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. A first name or pseudonym is required and will be displayed with your comment. Your email address is also required, but will be kept private. (Please note that we use gravatars here, which are tied to your email address.) A website/blog/twitter address is optional.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *