6 thoughts on “How Self-Talk Raises and Lowers Our Stress Levels, 1 of 2

  • September 15, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    I’ve always disliked the song ‘Don’t Worry, Be Happy’. I heard it a couple of weeks ago and cringed……it STUCK IN MY HEAD. But now, when I’m at work and people start to affect my mood I just sing a little ‘Don’t worry, be happy’ in my mind and dammit, it works!

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    • October 1, 2012 at 6:44 am

      Thanks for sharing, Susan! So appreciate your stopping by.

      Reply
  • September 19, 2012 at 11:27 pm

    It is true that self-talk does influence your self-image in the positive or negative way. But if a physical disorder such as hypoglycemia or hypothyroidism, affect you capacity to produce feel-good neurotransmitters,hen this should be treated first before considering “psychological” aspects of the self-image. Being depressed affects the self-image, but it cannot always be changed by changing your style of self-talk into a more positive way. Reda;Depression: A Nutritional Disorderhttp://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/2011/depression-a-nutritional-disorder/

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    • October 1, 2012 at 6:43 am

      Thanks for the comment, jurplesman. My approach is holistic. I agree that physical or emotional imbalances must also include biological solutions, such as lifestyle changes in nutritional intake and exercise, however dealing with psychological aspects need not be put aside. It’s a needed component to sustain other lifestyle changes.

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  • September 21, 2012 at 7:57 am

    Talking to yourself can be helpful or can be harmful. Talking to yourself you can analyse about yourself. It can help you to become better person. Doing it regularly and every time can increase your stress. I usually talk to myself to analyse that if I have said something which might have hurt the other one. On realizing my mistake, I try to improve it. Thinking about it again and again will not help me and will increase the stress.

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    • October 1, 2012 at 6:38 am

      Thanks for commenting Calgary. Yes, anxiously thinking about what you’re saying to yourself would like increase stress. It takes a mindful, consciously compassionate approach to grow awareness and make healthy choices accordingly. It would be impossible to do this around the clock. Select moments, especially key moments are a start. Thanks for writing.

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