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A Story of Devotion

Jose was born 79 years ago in Cuba, where he lived until 1963 when he immigrated to the USA. It was easy to understand why. Despite his age, Jose was possessed of the spirit, curiosity, sense of humor, and playfulness of a child. That would be enough to make anyone attractive. But there was something even more compelling about Jose that was less obvious until you got to know him a little better. Jose is a profoundly caring man. Although he has not had what most of us would consider to be an easy life, he has managed to live with an open heart and a profound commitment to giving to others.

Perhaps the greatest beneficiary of Jose’s generosity of spirit has been his wife Anna to whom he was married for 38 years. Anna passed away in 2009 after suffering for eleven years with Alzheimer’s disease. From the moment that her disease was diagnosed, Jose became her exclusive and then primary caregiver until her death.

“I knew even before the diagnosis was official that Anna had a physiological problem and I made a decision that I was going to dedicate my life to doing whatever I could to ease her physical and mental suffering. I first noticed that she as misplacing little things that she had been able to keep track of before. Anna was a schoolteacher for pre-kindergarten in a Catholic school in Florida. I wasn’t the only one who was noticing that Anna was becoming more forgetful, distracted, and absent-minded; the staff and administration noticed this too.”

“It got to the point where they couldn’t renew her contract because what had become a serious disability was preventing her from adequately fulfilling her responsibility to her students, whom she dearly loved. She was heart-broken to have to take early retirement.”

Left without an important source of family income, Jose and Anna would now also be left without the insurance that her job had provided for her, Jose, and their two daughters. Jose had been very active in supporting the church that he and is family attended. When he spoke about the family’s situation with their priest, he helped them secure health insurance. During this time Jose’s primary concern was on supporting Anna, who had still not been informed about her diagnosis and prognosis for the future. 

“I knew” Jose told us, “that Anna was not ready to accept the reality of her situation. Without actually saying so, she made that clear to me in no uncertain terms. I had to respect the limits of her capacity to face it, even though that meant having to ‘bend the truth’ to minimize her suffering”.

When it became apparent that Anna was not safe being left alone in the house or behind the wheel of their car, he told her that the car needed repairs but that it wasn’t worth fixing. Anna accepted Jose’s explanations when he was forced to remove other freedoms. “I think she might have had a greater awareness of her condition than she let on to me. I guess I’ll never know for sure.”

Shortly after turning 62, Jose took an early retirement from his business. After checking out the local memory care facilities for Alzheimer’s patients, Jose decided to keep Anna at home and be her primary caregiver on a daily basis. Over time, Jose’s energies were being severely depleted and he was in need of some support himself, so he checked out the local Alzheimer’s support group for caregivers. “It was very depressing”, he told us. “Everyone was so fearful and filled with sorrow that I knew that it wasn’t for me. My attitude towards the situation was very different from the people in that group.”

Jose stayed by Anna’s side practically non-stop for eleven years, providing increasingly higher levels of service as her dependency on him grew.

“Anna became seemed to feel much better when we had a predictable routine that she could rely upon. So there were regulatory scheduled events and activities that we did on a regular basis.  On Saturdays we went to the Mall and afterwards went to the movies that she always enjoyed. She loved Parrot Jungle which we visited every Sunday afternoon.”

Because they both had always loved to travel, Jose had handicapped apparatus installed in his car and they travelled extensively throughout the state of Florida.

Jose said “In many ways”, Jose told us,  “I was closer to Anna after Alzheimer’s than I had been prior to her illness. Her inability to communicate with me as easily as she used to challenged me to pay closer attention to her in order to understand what she was feeling and needing.

“For instance, I would see her holding her head and I knew she had a headache. She became like a little child who didn’t have sufficient language to express what was wrong. When she was constipated, to protect her health I always accompanied her to the bathroom. I watched to see if she was moving her bowls, since constipation can be a serious problem for people with Alzheimer’s. I would sometimes notice that she was limping and I would give her Tylenol. I stayed tuned into her just like I was nurturing a baby. I had been too preoccupied with my career to pay close attention to my daughters when I was younger. Because I was now retired, I could be fully available to my beloved Anna in her time of need. And for that I am deeply grateful.”

“Although she’s gone now, at least her body is, I still feel very connected to her. I visit her at the cemetery where she is buried every Sunday and speak with her like I did when she was alive. Of course I still miss her but I never feel lonely because of the depth of the connection that we have shared for so long.”

Jose’s story reminds us that love is timeless, and transcends even our physical presence. The love that Jose and Anna had was not fully developed from the beginning of their relationship. It grew and deepened through their shared contributions of care, attention, generosity, gratitude, forgiveness, compassion, and so much else that they gave to each other over the years. They co-created a partnership that exceeded their initial expectations and found that nothing not Alzheimer’s, not even death, can diminish it. Anna and Jose are not exceptional people, but they created an exceptional marriage out of their willingness to risk living with the devotion that comes from a life of openheartedness. Maybe the rest of us ordinary folks can do the same as well.

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Our newest book, That Which Doesn’t Kill Us: How One Couple Got Stronger at the Broken Places, has just been published by Sacred Life Publishers and been receiving rave reviews. Their story is illuminating, instructive, and deeply inspiring. It has been described as being as compelling and engaging as a page-turning novel. The book contains powerful messages that are embedded in its pages that can serve any couple that desires valuable wisdom which can serve them in facing the inevitable challenges that frequently confront many committed partnerships. The book is available online on Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. You can also receive a signed copy of That Which Doesn’t Kill Us by ordering directly from Bloomwork by calling (831) 421-9822 or emailing us at [email protected]. The cost is $16.95 plus tax, shipping & handling.

A Story of Devotion

Bloomwork

Linda Bloom LCSW and Charlie Bloom MSW are considered experts in the field of relationships. They have been married since 1972. They have both been trained as seminar leaders, therapists and relationship counselors and have been working with individuals, couples, and groups since 1975. They have been featured presenters at numerous conferences, universities, and institutions of learning throughout the country and overseas as well. They have appeared on over two hundred radio and TV programs. Linda and Charlie are co-authors of the widely acclaimed books: 101 Things I Wish I Knew When I Got Married: Simple Lessons to Make Love Last (over 100,000 copies sold) Secrets of Great Marriages: Real Truth from Real Couples about Lasting Love, and Happily Ever After...and 39 Other Myths about Love: Breaking Through to the Relationship of Your Dreams. The Blooms are excited to announce the release of their fourth book, That Which Doesn't Kill Us: How One Couple Became Stronger at the Broken Places. They live in Santa Cruz, California, near their two children and three grandchildren. To view our upcoming events and to sign up for our free newsletter, visit our website at: www.Bloomwork.com


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APA Reference
Bloom, L. (2018). A Story of Devotion. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 24, 2018, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/relationship-skills/2018/10/a-story-of-devotion/

 

Last updated: 4 Oct 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 4 Oct 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.