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Chronic Anxiety

Fix Is the New F-word

“I know what I’ll do…” starts Emily, after she’s just finished explaining a story about a conflict with a co-worker.

“Hold on there,“ I interrupt. “Are you trying to solve the problem?” I smile.

Emily smacks herself gently on the forehead and giggles. “You caught me… again.”



avoidance

Feeling Alone is Physically Painful

I remember coming home from the grocery store recently having been thrilled to leave the busy store and get back to the quiet of my own house. I walked in the door, put away my items and then looked around my kitchen. I was struck with a feeling of how alone and empty I was. The house was quiet, my cats were asleep, and I did not have a romantic relationship to distract from the aloneness.

I was alone with myself. I recognized a little tinge of panic creep up… okay a lot of panic… but I was sure to push it down quickly and promptly distracted myself with a TV show. I refused to let myself feel the discomfort of the loneliness.

The Physical Pain of Loneliness



avoidance

Overcontrolled people can have fun socializing too!

My friend Gina called one night saying she was throwing together a game night at her house asked if I wanted to come. It was 8.30pm on a Saturday. I sat at home contently watching a movie by myself and planning to be undisturbed for the night.

At first I was a little shocked because I usually don’t get impromptu calls to “party.” My friends know that I’m a bit of a plan-things-in-advance stickler, but as I reflected on going in my relaxed state of mind, I thought, “This movie can wait. You love games, go play!” So after a bit of a pause, I accepted the invitation, and drove over.

I got to Gina’s around 9pm, and I realized that I was the first to arrive. She told most of her friends were at other parties and were coming a bit later. Gina was in the kitchen, putting together quite an appetizer spread and her husband was selecting the music and singing.


anger

Stopping the Self-Hate Cycle

Recently I remember sitting in session with a client who was talking about all the ways he had failed his kids as a father.

I suggested that he might be in a self-hate cycle and he responded, “I don’t hate myself.” Hmmmm, call it what you will, but the way he was talking about himself was at the least unkind and at the most abusive.

One of the most pervasive issues that I see in my therapy practice is people beating themselves up. The pattern comes in all forms:
• an executive listing all his failings in his head, when he is reminded of one mistake
• a student thinking she should have done better on a test
• a man recalling a date and ruminating on what he should have done that he didn’t do
• a mother blaming herself for not having been more capable at a task
The list of self-hate tactics can go on and on. While it’s important to acknowledge mistakes and try and learn from them, it’s also good to know when striving for perfection becomes unhealthy.

The Self-Hate Cycle

You could consider that a self-hate cycle is actually an unhealthy overcontrolled coping technique. A cue comes in that reminds us of a failing. The cue could be something small like forgetting to return a phone call or something more emotional like a seeing a photo of an ex-spouse who you still wish you were with.

Then some sort of unwanted private experience occurs like a sudden headache, sadness, fogginess, anger, nausea, shame or many others. Next starts our social signaling. Maybe you get quiet, leave the room, distract yourself, work harder or start putting yourself down out loud.



Chronic Anxiety

7 Steps to Make It in a Relationship with a Paranoid Partner

If your partner has paranoia, it may wax and wane over the course of the relationship, but likely it will always be present in the background. Paranoia tends to manifest as a desire for control at all costs. In romantic relationships control seeking can show up in many different behaviors: information gathering, question asking, searching, reorganizing, spying, tracking, accusations of falsehoods, trap setting, or going through another’s phone and computer. Usually a combination of these actions is present.

The paranoid person may not think that these behaviors are strange and may even try to convince you that they are sensible actions in a relationship. Don’t be fooled by this way of thinking. These are anxiety reduction techniques at another person’s expense.

No one can ever know everything about another person, and who would want to??!! For example, do you really need to know every bodily function your partner has, or that they think your mother is a b-word, or even that a waiter broke a plate during lunch. Of course not. That’s why we edit and/or share given each unique life situation.


anger

Caught in a Paranoid Love Relationship

“You’re cheating on me, I know it.” For many men and women in romantic relationships, this statement is all too familiar. Being accused of something false is not only shocking, but hurtful and leaves the accused person with a huge decision about how to react. Do you defend yourself, ignore it, or try some other crafty reaction? What was once a safe, committed relationship is suddenly a paranoid trap.

Many significant others report being blindsided by the paranoia of their partner, but there may have been subtle clues that the paranoia was forming.
- “Where did you get that new perfume?”
- “Who is Bill from work?”
- “You really like sex, don’t you?”
- “What did you do while I was visiting my parents?”
These types of questions might be more than just a partner’s curiosity when followed by unfounded accusations.

Paranoia vs Jealousy


anger

Pushing Through Pain: aka Too Much Impulse Control

I am in yoga class and have just been silently congratulating myself on my amazing Crow pose (resting my knees on my upper arms, feet up, with just my palms touching the ground). I’m thinking how awesome I have become at this posture and really feel secure in it.

And then, I fall.

Epic failure style. My nose plants into the wood floor and blood starts spewing on my mat and the ground. I barely react, other than to take my towel and hold it to my nose until the blood flow subsides.

Neither girl practicing next to me says a word, so I think, “Oh it can’t be that bad.” I return to my yoga practice, while little drops of blood fall onto my mat. When I finish class, I realize that not only is my nose still bleeding, but now it’s throbbing.

Finally the girl next to me looks over and says, “Your nose looks really swollen, I think you need ice.”

I say, “Oh it’ll be fine, I only live a mile away.”

I walk out to my car and casually look at myself in the mirror… OMG, my nose is twice it’s normal size and all red. I think it’s broken. The doctor I go to see confirms it’s broken and I silently question why the hell didn’t I leave class when I got hurt?

Too Much Control