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How Trump Won: Whistle-Stopping By Private Jet

So how did he do it!? How did President-Elect Trump win? What did he do so right?

In my opinion, it’s really quite simple.

First, he spoke to the pressing issues concerning John & Jane Doe. Health insurance. Jobs. Safety. Simple, basic needs. If the government has their sticky fingers in those particular pies, then the American people expects them to get it right.

Secondly, he understood what was going on and I mean really going on. Oh, he doesn’t talk about it, but he’s got his finger on the pulse of who’s really pulling the strings. He’s followed the money trail. He’s “awake” and informed.

His crowds were “awake” too. They’d taken the initiative to inform and educate themselves on the candidates as well as the issues. They too had their finger on the pulse, gleaning data from all sources, not merely the news venues who (unlike Newsweek) so narrowly avoided having a “Dewey Wins” moment on Election Day. They saw straight through the paranoiac reductio ad absurdum assigning of this “-ism” and that “-phobia” to Trump and were savvy to the projection wielded before, during and after the campaign. They believed the evidence of their own eyes, realizing that the huge crowds at Trump’s rallies betrayed oversampling in the national polls.

“Maybe they wanted to encourage Donald Trump…maybe they wanted to thank him…”

Most importantly, President-Elect Trump went to the people. Whistle-stopping…by private jet.

Whistle-stopping is as old as the hills. Historians trace it back to the campaign-by-train of William Henry Harrison in 1836. But my favorite whistle-stopper was a Democratic president whom I admire greatly, Harry S. Truman. In 1948, Truman, wife Bess and daughter Margaret traveled 31,000 miles and delivered 356 speeches from the caboose of their train, the Ferdinand Magellan.
As always, Hollywood director Frank Capra explained whistle-stopping best in his 1941 movie, Meet John Doe. In the movie, actor Gary Cooper (as John Doe) takes to the rails like Trump (by private jet!) to bring a message of hope to America. As Cooper travels from one rally to another, he ponders on why people come to see him speak?

What makes them do it? What makes them come and listen…
I’ve been trying to figure it out…
lately I’ve been watching them while I talked to them.
I could see something in their faces.
I could feel that they were hungry for something.
Do you know what I mean? Maybe that’s why they came.
Maybe they were just lonely and wanted somebody to say hello
to.

Why did the crowds take off work to attend a Trump rally? Why did they queue up three hours before it started? Why was the line walking, by actual measurement, three miles just to reach the door already aware that there probably wouldn’t be room for them in the auditorium or hangar. Why? Why did they do it when they could’ve comfortably live streamed the rally on YouTube.

Maybe they were lonely. Maybe they were hopeless. Maybe they needed to brush shoulders with other John and Jane Does who thought, felt and suffered like they did. Maybe they needed to feel hope again. Maybe they wanted to feel patriotic.

Maybe they wanted to encourage Donald Trump, to let him know that the nation was rallied behind him. Maybe they wanted to thank him for taking time off from his successful career and jet-setting lifestyle to guide our Ship of State safely into port. Maybe they wanted him to know that his foot-in-mouth syndrome was charmingly indicative of honesty and they understood what he was really trying to say in his raw big-picture undetailed CEO-esque way. Maybe they wanted to hear things like “freedom” and “Americanism” and “God bless America.” Maybe they wanted to put their hand over their heart and recite the Pledge of Allegiance. Maybe they wanted to stand at attention, bare-headed, and reverently raise their voice and join thousands of other voices singing a cappella

Oh, say can you see,
By the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hailed,
At the twilight’s last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
Through the perilous fight,
O’er the ramparts we watched,
Were so gallantly streaming.
And the rocket’s red glare,
The bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night,
That our flag was still there.
Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
For the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

Maybe they wanted to be a part of history.

Maybe they loved America.


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How Trump Won: Whistle-Stopping By Private Jet

Lenora Thompson

Lenora Thompson is a syndicated Huffington Post and YourTango freelance writer and entrepreneur. Her readers call her the "Edward Snowden" and "Wikileaks" of narcissism because of her no-holds-barred-take-no-prisoners approach to writing about narcissism. “Narcissism Meets Normalcy” is the real-life, ongoing story of her healing journey from being held “hostage” by a multi-generational, cult-like narcissistic family. It's gritty and real, bloody and bruised, humorous and sarcastic. Lenora Thompson considers herself a “whistleblower,” shining a spotlight on narcissistic abuse so others can also claim their freedom and experience healing. To learn more about Lenora, subscribe to her bi-weekly e-newsletter, contribute to help her husband fight his extremely rare lung disease, Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis and shop her e-store, please visit www.lenorathompsonwriter.com.


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APA Reference
Thompson, L. (2016). How Trump Won: Whistle-Stopping By Private Jet. Psych Central. Retrieved on March 23, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/narcissism/2016/11/how-trump-won-whistlestopping-by-private-jet/

 

Last updated: 17 Nov 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 17 Nov 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.