10 thoughts on “Boy Interrupted: Bipolar Depression and a Teen’s Suicide – Where Did Medication Fit In?

  • December 3, 2011 at 12:23 am

    What an incredibly brave act by the parents to make the documentary in the first place. This is a sad but common story.
    There are two major risks faced by people with bipolar disorder hi-lighted by the story. These risks are not only faced by the young.
    The first risk is the danger of coming off one’s meds, particularly unsupervised.
    The second risk is that statistics clearly show that people with bipolar have a much higher than normal risk of committing suicide.

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  • December 5, 2011 at 10:06 am

    My heart goes out to this family……

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  • December 7, 2011 at 12:19 pm

    Suicide is seldom accepted by those left behind as a sane alternative to a life of insanity. But it does stop it, when nothing else will. Sometimes the journey can be too painful and too exhausting to phathom taking another breath. We left behind want for our sake , that they push on, no matter the living hell they live in. While we try to ask why, we should be praying for his soul to find peace at last. We should never give up trying to help, but accept their decision to chose their own path. In my book ‘Talking to the living and the dead – soul to soul communication’ there are several revealing chapters on suicide and it’s aftermath. Ultimately, all one can really do is pray for their soul to find peace.

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  • December 11, 2011 at 7:05 am

    This is incredibly sad. Being almost exactly in his shoes I have to wonder why he came off meds without trying something else. Why oh why did they at least not have tried ECT (Electro Convulsive Therapy)? I’m not “fixed” but ECT is the reason I’m still here trying. I didn’t want to do any of the treatment but sometimes those around you have to step in, whether it is wanted or not. We lose too many people to our disease. So, so sad.

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  • December 16, 2011 at 7:29 am

    i was diagnosed with bipolar when i was 13 and i understand that feeling of wanting to be normal and being stuck in that “hole”. i’m extremely surprised i made it to the age of 20. i’m 29 now and still am surprised i’ve made it this far. medication is not something i want to take but i know i have to take it. i understand the side effects of lithium, i was on that for over 12 years. i don’t understand the doctor not trying another combination or at least hospitalizing him during the transition knowing his history.

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  • December 31, 2011 at 6:10 pm

    It was fitting I run into this article at this very minute…I sit in bed with my 13 yr old who is finally sleeping. Earlier, he had such an awful swing in mood, he cried out “When will I stop crawling through the darkness? This is every day of my life” He cursed and hit me…but I was too afraid to leave his side….afraid that he would jump from the balcony or out of the bedroom window. For all of you parents dealing with this dreadful disease, stay strong, and may the Lord be with you and your children always.

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  • February 10, 2012 at 2:55 pm

    u old peeps r total dorks. Did it ever occur to u dikheads dat he might have not liked dis world? His rents r morons who videoed him when he was sad…u assholes

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    • February 11, 2012 at 10:42 am

      Ignoring the diction for a sec, he does have a point – I would have been furious, minimum, at my parents for the intrusion of being filmed. But let’s also keep in mind that at times he was manic and performative and seemed happy to be on camera. P.S. It’s official: At 28, I’m old!

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  • July 14, 2014 at 8:16 pm

    What can we do? Evan was so brave and had so much courage for a 15 year old boy. I am 48 and have sufferred in silence for so long. I have tried so many anti depressants. I am a nurse and I hold the suffering of my patients and myself inside because society has become so cold and crule. Evan had so much courage. He is nothing less than at peace. I am sorry his mom and dad could not reach him. The lower case is intentional.

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