3 thoughts on “Keeping Medications Secret – A Way to Curb Abuse?

  • October 9, 2012 at 8:04 am

    There are many reasons to keep your meds quiet, especially in the years between independence and true maturity (the late teens to the late 20s) when friends take first importance in a young person’s life.Suppose you’re prevailed upon to sell or gift a few pills. Now, you’re short a few meds, but the risks are much worse than a few missed days’ treatment.Your non-ADHD friend’s health becomes partly your responsibility — suppose they don’t use them to study, but instead take all four Concertas and crash their car?Your chances of having your room searched and your meds (and other stuff) stolen is notably increased.If your sale or gift becomes known to authorities, you could lose medical access to stimulant meds permanently, at a time of life when ADHD support is most needed to get you through school and life challenges.With your diagnosis revealed, you’re also exposed to the ignorant prejudices of the deniers, and the crazy theories of the people who think any “drug” is a DRUG and must turn you into a raving lunatic with a machete, a wild driver, or at the least a mentally damaged person who is likely a poor choice as boyfriend/employee/business partner/etc.Yes, combating the stigma is important, wherever stigma arises. But it takes people who have a certain level of strength and support. For the average struggling teen ADHDer, it’s just one more egg to add to all the others he is trying to juggle.Noni

    Reply
    • October 9, 2012 at 10:57 am

      Noni, thank you for your thoughtful response. You give some very strong reasons to keep medications secret and make a good case for the degree of peer pressure that college-aged young people are under. I’d like to highlight the flip side of peers being so very important at this time of life: Peer support and close friendships matter a great deal, perhaps even more so for young people with additional psychological challenges to deal with. Taking medications comes with its own long list of complications, and it can be very isolating to feel there you can’t confide in peers about these challenges and complications (add to that the fact that many college students don’t necessarily receive counseling in combination with their prescriptions, because they get the prescriptions from their pediatrician or family doctor back home). I don’t mean to say that students with prescriptions for controlled substances should go shouting it from the rooftops, only that “keep your medications secret” shouldn’t be taken as gospel, especially for students who do feel strong enough to resist peer pressure, want to make a point of fighting stigma, or simply crave and need support from a few trusted friends.

      Reply
  • October 9, 2012 at 10:00 am

    ” I THINK THE STUDENTS ABUSING THESE MEDS SHOULD BE PROSECUTED, BECAUSE PEOPLE LIKE ME WHO DESPERATELY NEED THESE TYPE OF MEDS TO BE SOMEWHAT NORMAL AND FUNCTIONING SUFFER WHEN DEA PUTS LIMITS ON ON SUPPLY BECAUSE PEOPLE ” SPECIFICALLY STUDENTS ARE ABUSING THEM ……….

    Reply
 

Join the Conversation!

We invite you to share your thoughts and tell us what you think in this public forum. Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. A first name or pseudonym is required and will be displayed with your comment. Your email address is also required, but will be kept private. (Please note that we use gravatars here, which are tied to your email address.) A website/blog/twitter address is optional.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *