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Archives for Anti-anxiety Drugs

Adherence

How Lena Dunham’s real-life OCD made it onto Girls

How closely does a writer's work mimic her life experiences? It's a perennial question made all the more irresistible as it pertains to Lena Dunham,  the 26-year-old creator of one of TV's most talked-about shows, and her recently-revealed history of  Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

In the first season of HBO's Girls, Dunham stirred up debate by, among other things, repeatedly revealing her less-than-perfect body while playing the show's main character, Hannah Horvath. What got people talking as the...
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Adherence

How did Lena Dunham turn OCD and ‘countless psychiatric meds’ into a hit TV show?

Lena Dunham, the 26-year-old force behind HBO's popular and much-discussed show Girls, hasn't grown famous through discretion.

Part of the cringe-inducing delight of watching Girls is hearing Hannah say things and do things she knows she shouldn't. And part of what's refreshing about Dunham herself are her irreverent, indecorous comments and self-revelations, whether on Twitter, New Yorker essays, or interviews.

So I was especially curious to hear what Dunham had to say about her obsessive-compulsive...
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ADHD drugs

Think Kids Are “Overmedicated”? First Consider This.

I've argued before that declaring American kids and teens to be "overmedicated" is something of a cop-out.

How can people say what constitutes overmedication when they can't - or won't - specify what would constitute an acceptable number or percentage of kids taking psychiatric meds?

Still, I do care about the numbers, because they can give us clues as to which kids and how many are getting appropriate treatment for emotional and behavioral problems.

A...
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Abuse and diversion

Mixing Meds and Alcohol: Just How Dangerous Is It?

Most psychiatric drugs bear some version of the warning: "Do not drink alcoholic beverages when taking this medication."

In reality, though, many people taking psych meds drink anyway. They have various reasons: not wanting to curtail their fun, not putting much stock in the warnings, or simply thinking it's easier to take a proffered drink than explain why they're turning it down.

Doctors oftentimes don't bother to talk to patients about potential...
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Abuse and diversion

Keeping Medications Secret – A Way to Curb Abuse?

A recent article in USA Today about the challenges of dealing with ADHD at college suggested students keep their conditions - and their prescriptions - secret from their peers.

The reason? Abuse of stimulant medications like Adderall and Ritalin is rampant on college campuses, where the medications are used as "study drugs" and also to provide a boost of energy during long nights of drinking and partying.

As a result, students with such...
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ADHD drugs

A Hierarchy of Medications?

People who take psychiatric medications long-term are no strangers to stigma, or the threat of it. We perennially face, for example, the question of whether it's worth risking others' judgment and the potential negative repercussions of disclosing our conditions -- and the fact that we take medication for them.

But you can commit to taking medications long-term and still perpetuate or further the stigma associated with meds. And I don't just mean that...
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ADHD drugs

Medicating Class Cut-Ups But Overlooking the Rest

This weekend a mother published a New York Times column about how her son came to be diagnosed with ADHD and became a member of the ballooning "Ritalin Generation."

"Just a little medication," the teacher told the boy's mother, "could really turn things around" for the boy, who was having trouble focusing on class worksheets and lining up quietly for transitions between classes.

When the mother firmly responded that she and her husband weren't...
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ADHD drugs

The Hidden Costs of Medication

Psychiatric medications have a lot of potential hidden costs.

We don't know, for example, how taking them from a young age affects long-term brain and psychological development in kids. They have myriad of side effects, some serious, like diabetes, high cholesterol, neurological impairment and birth defects when taken in pregnancy. They carry stigma, both from others and self-imposed.

But I'm not talking metaphorically about costs here. I'm talking straight-up financial outlays. Taking psychiatric...
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Abuse and diversion

Taking Meds, Being Judged

With all the attention on the misuse of psychiatric drugs, I think it's worth taking a look at how the increased scrutiny affects people who have a diagnosis and a legitimate prescription.

I don't mean to suggest that just because someone has been diagnosed and a doctor has seen fit to prescribe her medication that she necessarily needs the meds - or even that she "should" be on them....
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ADHD drugs

Can We Medicate Away Childhood Bullying?


In recent years, there has been a huge increase in the prescribing of psychiatric medication to treat aggression in children.

Specifically, atypical antipsychotic and mood stabilizing drugs, originally developed for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in adults, are now routinely prescribed to treat the aggression that occurs in a variety of childhood psychiatric disorders.

Prescriptions for atypical antipsychotics increased sixfold between 1993 and 2002, and the majority were prescribed to treat non-psychotic aggression, according to a...
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