Comments on
The Mindfulness Solution for Everyday Problems: An Interview with Ronald Siegel, Psy.D.


Today I have the honor of bringing to you the author of the new book, The Mindfulness Solution: Everyday Practices for Everyday Problems. Ronald D. Siegel, Psy.D. is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School where he has taught for the past 25 years, a Board and Faculty member of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and a long-term student of mindfulness meditation.

Dr. Siegel is also co-editor of Mindfulness and Psychotherapy and coauthor of Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain. He maintains a private clinical practice in Lincoln, Massachusetts and teaches internationally about mindfulness and psychotherapy and mind-body treatment.

Today, Dr. Siegel talks to us about how we can work with mindfulness to support us with stress, anxiety, and depression. 

3 thoughts on “The Mindfulness Solution for Everyday Problems: An Interview with Ronald Siegel, Psy.D.

  • May 8, 2010 at 11:50 am

    Excellent article/interview! Something I will be sharing with other professionals as well as some clients I work with.

    Thanks!

    Reply
  • May 9, 2010 at 9:23 pm

    “Mindfulness practices, by training us to open to our full range of emotions in the present moment, work against this depressive pattern. They help us to come alive in each moment.” Indeed, learning to interrupt the stories from the thoughts that are about the past or future I think is key to finding some daily relief from the stream of negative thoughts cycling in my brain/emotion system. My recent first visit to a new (for me) psychiatrist was in retrospect very amazing. I opened up to my emotions of the moment and expressed them as I relayed my past and present to him. He suggested that I work with my councelor on my feelings about psychiatry and medication for mental illness; since I had not fully realized that I had strong anger and fears from my previous interactions and experience – his assessment and direction hit the spot – and I will work through the past to improve the present. However, since I was so forthcoming, I am now wondering if it is in my best interest to express the feelings/opinions that I have – I am too revealing for my own good? Yet, how do I get the help I feel I need without that honesty with myself and provider of mental health assistance? I googled something yesterday, and eventually found this site; “how to talk to my psychiatrist” is what I started with. Back to response to this article, I think that “sitting with” my thoughts and emotions, and finding that I can more fully experience them instead of avoid them; will open up more space for me to relax and enjoy the present moment. Thanks for the article.

    Reply
  • July 26, 2010 at 12:20 pm

    Thanks for the simplicity of your message about mindfulness as an opportunity to be present to emotions that you would typically try to avoid and how this is useful for patients with anxiety and depression.

    Reply
 

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