9 thoughts on “Stress got you down? Try this tip to balance throughout the day

  • February 2, 2009 at 12:51 pm

    Thank you for doing this blog. I’ve read the first posts and now added it to my roll.

    Martin, psychologystudent in Sweden

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  • February 2, 2009 at 3:08 pm

    Great Martin, I look forward to interacting with you along the way.

    Elisha Goldstein, Ph.D.

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  • February 7, 2009 at 8:38 am

    I have just discovered your web page. I am so grateful! I run the DBT program at the local Mental Health center and have found that Mindfulness has made a big difference in my management of the stress of my job. I need to be refreshed and reminded to take time to use the skills I know to use. I appreciate your being available to offer some refreshment! Thanks

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  • February 8, 2009 at 2:54 pm

    In my own practice I often suggest another acronym that an Australian psychiatrist introduced way back in the 50’s or 60’s. It’s a little harder to remember than “stop” : FAFA. Face,accept,flout,allow time to pass. 1.FACE that fact that you’re experiencing anxiety/panic/fear 2.ACCEPT the emotion rather than fighting it or struggling to try to eliminate it 3.FLOUT with the emotion, much like you might relax and flout in salt water. 4. ALLOW time to pass; she points out that with panic it almost always DOES pass in no more than 4 minutes! I often use this one myself and my patients find it really helpful. Martin thanks so much for this blog – it’s the first blog I’ve ever felt inspired to join and participate in! I sometimes have requests for referrals in the LA area and I’d be grateful if you could send me your contact info. I’m in the San Luis Obispo area if you’d ever want to send anyone my way – info on my website! Thank you for this…

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  • February 9, 2009 at 10:04 am

    Thank you so much for your additions here Jill, it sounds like the FAFA description resonates well with many people. Now it is here for everyone to benefit from!

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  • February 28, 2009 at 3:51 pm

    What are your suggestions for a surgical tech working beside yelling surgeons when the procedure isn’t an emergency? The tech can’t stop what they’re doing or leave the OR or even say anything.

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  • February 28, 2009 at 4:55 pm

    Thank you, Elisha. I am just becoming aware of mindfullness and it’s benefits. I spend a lot of time alone, which can be peaceful… but not always!

    One thing that helps me is to talk to God about things that interest me or stress me and this calms me and focuses me in the now and helps bring me out of my stress or worry.

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  • February 28, 2009 at 5:27 pm

    Thank you everyone for your responses. Sometimes we encounter people who really press our buttons and in the case that Arden is talking about, he can’t leave the OR and feels he can’t even say anything. To use this example, Arden, in the moment, something that the surgeons are doing (i.e., yelling) is causing discomfort in you. In looking closer at this, we might see a reaction to this discomfort in the form of distressing thoughts or feelings. There is often some kind of impulse to get away from this distressing feeling. In practicing becoming more aware of the present moment, we can learn to approach these thoughts, feelings, and breathe with them instead of trying to get away from them. We can do this in the moment while the distress is occurring. It’s in the avoidance where we find our greatest struggle. In order to become more effective at this, it’s important to practice when the distress is not so high. Most of all, know this is a practice and takes time to cultivate. But over time it will be a more gentle, compassionate, and effective route to go for your own health and well-being.

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  • January 23, 2014 at 8:06 pm

    I am very grateful for your wonderful workbook, and often ask participants in both my MBSR classes and in my private psychotherapy practice to purchase it. It augments Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Full Catastrophe and the MBSR course outline perfectly, reducing grealy the amount of time spent in preparing classes. It is written concisely, in easily understood language and concepts that my clients grasp, even during crisis. Thank you! You have given us a gem!

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