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Bipolar I

How NOT TO Break Up.

We’ve all read enough “How To” books. It’s time to address how NOT TO do something.

Here are some tips on how NOT TO break up:

Do NOT dig up the past.  You know a list of reasons why you should break up.  Keep it to yourself.  Voicing your laundry list doesn’t do anyone any good.  You know.  That’s enough.   Both of you are at such a vulnerable place, hurting one another is not good.  You will regret it.  Remember this is your moment.  Don’t let your emotions get the best of you. Loose lips cause pain.  No one needs it.



Bipolar II

What I Wish Someone Asked My Parents: Is Your Child Bipolar II?

Extremities and passion are the bottom line of a child with Bipolar II.  A Bipolar II individual is ruled by an intensity, that sometimes gets misunderstood as out of control or hyper at times.  It can seem like symptoms of ADHD.  It’s not, and it’s easy to get caught up in buzz word diagnoses when really it’s a form of manic depression that calls for attention and education.

Here are some things that my parents never knew, and I wish someone had told them:

I’m not hyper sensitive, I’m Bipolar II
I’m not irritable, I’m Bipolar II
I’m not out of control, I’m Bipolar II
I’m not restless, I’m Bipolar II



Bipolar I

Wacko at Work – When your privacy becomes public

Some of us decide to be open about our mental illness in the work place.  Some of us choose not to let co-workers know of our disease.  So what do you do when you are outted against your will at work?

Sometimes judgment, rumors, and gossip can float around work when your colleagues discover you are mentally ill.  And this can be a hard adjustment for those that prefer to keep their health private.  If you are in a bad mood, instead of just being in a bad mood you might get labeled as “moody.”  People are quick to go to buzz words like “crazy” or “odd” when really, you're just like everyone else that has their good and bad days.  But, sometimes it can be really frustrating and quite frankly, annoying.

Here are some tools to consider trying when your private life becomes public:

Take a mental health day – I had a co-worker once that survived breast cancer and had a clean bill of health. However, once a month she got to take a day off.  She more or less (admittedly!) pulled what she called the cancer card to gain sympathy and to justify taking a day off when no one else was allowed to validate time off.  Guess what..you can!!  So, do it!  If they know you’re mentally ill, what’s wrong with taking a mental health day?!  Some may say you are exploiting your mental illness but, in my opinion, if you find yourself in an uncomfortable work situation due to public knowledge of your mental illness, why not take a day, or two!  It’s only fair!


Bipolar I

Poem Of A Bipolar Child

This is a poem from a bipolar child looking back on the work of a remarkable mother (1984).

And I walk into a coffee shop

With my mother

And she points to the silver jar

With chocolate fingers of dessert secrets

And I point before

A breath of time

Can register...


Bipolar I

Choices – Living in Your Bipolar Relationship

We’re on, we’re off, we’re together, we’re broken up, we’re up and down, and up and down, just like my disease.

There is no pill for the choices you make in your relationships.  We can’t blame our mental illness on our inability to stand by our word.  You want to break up?  Do it.  Period.  Done. Next.  You don’t?  Then stop playing the tug and pull game with your mind.  Don’t find yourself going back and forth and back and forth cause your meds will do what they can to monitor your moods but ultimately, it is up to you to monitor your behavior and stand by the choices you make.

It… is… not… easy.