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Managing Stress & Hot Sauce

It has taken me a long time to figure out the root of stress so I can do my best to manage it. Usually when you think of stress you think of external aspects that cause stress like worrying about money, or problems in a relationship, or challenges with your job, when really stress is not essentially outside of your life but more so inside your person. It’s rooted internally, not externally. When you think of it like that you can begin to grow strength which will work towards diminishing stress.

For example, you receive an email from your boss that you are not getting along with, and the mere thought of opening it causes you to become overcome with anxiety. So what do you do? You might immediately blame your boss for causing you to break out into a sweat. You think to yourself they are causing me stress when really you are causing yourself stress. If you want to understand stress and how to manage it, you must look within to try and figure out what caused that stress. Why does that stressor have power? Since stress is not an external power, and resides within our being, that means we are responsible for finding ways to manage it. You have to do work to curb that stress within. You might practice yoga, or cook, or journal, or dance. There are a myriad of activities you can do to strengthen yourself which in turn will temper stress. When you think if it as something internal you start to take the power away from the external factors that trigger stress.

I have high blood pressure, struggle with anxiety, and experience insomnia. All these issues cause me stress. However, these are issues that I cultivate on my own, and have power over on my own should I choose to take action. I can’t blame external factors but have to do the hard work, and I mean it’s hard work to manage stress once you realize it stems from an internal place. Sticking to a routine to keep a steady sleep schedule takes work. Working out to help my blood pressure takes work. Meditating to help release anxiety takes work. When you stop pointing the finger at external factors, you have a starting place to build internal power which will better help you manage stress. It’s easy to point the finger at others to blame for your stress when really, you need to take a good look inside, and be accountable for your stress. Once you do that external factors lose their power which is a relief cause, if you are responsible for your stress then, only you can do the hard work to manage it, which makes you inevitably in control of your stress.

Even writing this is causing me some stress cause as I look back, now I become aware that if I want to lower my blood pressure, curb anxiety, and experience a better sleep pattern only I can do that. I have to be accountable, responsible, and aware that I am in control it if I do the hard work. But, at the same time, it’s a relief to know that since stress stems from within, than any and all external stressors lose their power. So inevitably, I come out on top. I win.

Ok, I’m not totally winning cause I just put hot sauce on carne asada which is not helping my blood pressure at all, and a plate for a heart attack, but, I’m human.

Managing Stress & Hot Sauce


Erica Loberg

Erica Loberg was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA. She attended Columbia University in New York and graduated with a BA in English. She is a published poet and author of Inside the Insane, Screaming at the Void, What Men Should Know About Women, What Women Should Know About Men, Diamonds From The Rough and Undressed.


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APA Reference
Loberg, E. (2019). Managing Stress & Hot Sauce. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 24, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/manic-depression/2019/08/27/managing-stress/

 

Last updated: 27 Aug 2019
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