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What Men Should Know About Women

There is a fine line between being sexual and being sensual when it falls under the umbrella of female sexuality. There’s another fine line between being honest and offensive.

My latest book, “What Men Should Know About Women,” was recently released. It is a provocative, fiercely honest, and often times humorous collection of poetry about the relationship between men and women. My book also takes the reader on a journey through the eyes of a woman’s perspective on sexuality.

Since it tackles female sexuality head on, as a result, I have given some thought about how men, versus women, will receive my book. The feedback I’ve received from men thus far is that they love it; some women, not so much. Although there are women who embrace and love aspects of female sexuality brought forth in the work – subjects that women might be afraid or embarrassed to admit – there is another side to consider. Some women are more on the fence when it comes to their feedback, and I wonder why this is the case. As a culture do women fear discussing their sexuality in a raw erotic fashion? Are women more prone to be judgmental and catty when it comes to another woman talking about topics that entice men?

To be honest, I wonder why men are into it and women seem to hold their tongue or get embarrassed. It is interesting that female sexuality generates a divide between male and female reactions. But don’t get me wrong, it’s too early to really tell how the book will be perceived, and I thoroughly look forward to the audience’s responses.

For now, some women are telling me to be more cautious; be careful not to expose so much of myself when really I am using my own personal experiences to encapsulate aspects of female sexuality. On the flip side, some women are grateful that I voiced the subject of female sexuality on topics that women might be uncomfortable sharing.  I bring an honest voice about sexuality to the table. Meanwhile, men seem to be comfortable with the work. They find it open-minded and even educational. Then there are others who find it shocking. This divide that seems to be on the horizon only makes me further wonder why women and men interpret the subject of female sexuality on two polar sides of the spectrum.

Thus far it shows insight into the divide between males and females in our culture, and it will be interesting to further examine this divide, which I am sure will unfold with no mercy.

Yet, and this is important, and this my message: Despite what unfolds, and despite what people say, or societal constraints, I’d like to think we don’t have to compartmentalize the sexes.  I have masculine and feminine attributes about my person, my body, my soul, and my mental state, that hopefully send a message from an individual, not a “female” per se.

To find out more about “What Men Should Know About Women” see links below:

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What Men Should Know About Women

Publisher:

Chipmunka Classics

 

Woman in red photo available from Shutterstock

What Men Should Know About Women


Erica Loberg

Erica Loberg was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA. She attended Columbia University in New York and graduated with a BA in English. She is a published poet and author of Inside the Insane, Screaming at the Void, What Men Should Know About Women, What Women Should Know About Men, Diamonds From The Rough and Undressed.


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APA Reference
Loberg, E. (2015). What Men Should Know About Women. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 15, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/manic-depression/2015/10/13/what-men-should-know-about-women/

 

Last updated: 28 Oct 2015
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