Home » ADHD » Blogs » Living with ADHD » Social Communication Disorder vs. ADHD

Social Communication Disorder vs. ADHD

Introduction

Have you ever heard of Social Communication Disorder?  This article will provide the differences between Social Communication Disorder and ADHD.

What Is Social Communication Disorder?

According to autismspeaks.org, the following can be stated about the criteria for Social Communication Disorder:

SCD is diagnosed based on difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal social communication skills. These skills include:

* responding to others

Gesturing is an important form of nonverbal social communication.* using gestures (like waving or pointing)

* taking turns when talking or playing

* talking about emotions and feelings

* staying on topic

* adjusting speech to fit different people or situations – for instance, talking differently to a young child versus an adult or lowering one’s voice in a library.

* asking relevant questions or responding with related ideas during conversation

* using words for a variety of purposes such as greeting people, making comments, asking questions, making promises, etc.

* making and keeping friends

What Is ADHD?

According to images.pearsonclinical.com, the following criteria are present for a diagnosis of ADHD:

1. Inattention: Six (or more) of the following symptoms have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with developmental level and that negatively impacts directly on social and academic/occupational activities:
a. Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork,
at work, or during other activities (e.g., overlooks or misses details, work is inaccurate).
b. Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (e.g., has difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading).
c. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly (e.g., mind seems elsewhere, even in
the absence of any obvious distraction).
d. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked).
e. Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities (e.g., difficulty managing sequential tasks; difficulty keeping materials and belongings in order; messy, disorganized work; has poor time management; fails to meet deadlines).
f. Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental
effort (e.g., schoolwork or homework; for older adolescents and adults, preparing reports,
completing forms, reviewing lengthy papers).
g. Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
h. Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli (for older adolescents and adults, may include unrelated thoughts).
i. Is often forgetful in daily activities (e.g., doing chores, running errands; for older adolescents and adults, returning calls, paying bills, keeping appointments).
2. Hyperactivity and impulsivity: Six (or more) of the following symptoms have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with developmental level and that negatively impacts directly on social and academic/occupational activities:
a. Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet or squirms in seat.
b. Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected (e.g., leaves his or her place in the classroom, in the office or other workplace, or in other situations that require remaining in place).
c. Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is inappropriate. (
Note: In adolescents or adults, may be limited to feeling restless.)
d. Often unable to play or engage in leisure activities quietly.
e. Is often “on the go,” acting as if “driven by a motor” (e.g., is unable to be or uncomfortable
being still for extended time, as in restaurants, meetings; may be experienced by others as
being restless or difficult to keep up with).
f. Often talks excessively.
g. Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed (e.g., completes people’s
sentences; cannot wait for turn in conversation).
h. Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn (e.g., while waiting in line).
i. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations, games, or activities; may start using other people’s things without asking or receiving permission; for adolescents and adults, may intrude into or take over what others are doing).
Conclusion
This article has provided the differences between Social Communication Disorder and ADHD.

 

Social Communication Disorder vs. ADHD

Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


No comments yet... View Comments / Leave a Comment

 

 

APA Reference
Walters, L. (2017). Social Communication Disorder vs. ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 20, 2018, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2017/05/social-communication-disorder-vs-adhd/

 

Last updated: 7 May 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 7 May 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.