Introduction

In my previous article, I mentioned three books for children and their parents to read for ADHD.  In this article, I will expand upon this topic and include three more books for children and their parents to read about ADHD.

Playing Tyler

According to www.understood.org, the first book for children and their parents to read is called “Playing Tyler” by T.L. Costa.  According to www.understood.org, the following information can be noted about this book:

Tyler MacCandless has adult-sized problems. A drunk driver killed his dad. His big brother’s in rehab. And his ADHD isn’t helping matters, especially at school. But just when things seem unbearable, Tyler’s given a flight simulator video game to beta test. If he does well, he might have a shot at getting into flight school. But what if the game’s not really a game? This twisty, technology-rich plot (which includes a bit of romance) will keep teens on the edge of their seats.

This book is suitable for teenagers 13 years and older.

The Alphabet War: A Story About Dyslexia

According to www.understood.org, the second book that children and their parents will enjoy is called “The Alphabet War: A Story About Dyslexia,” written by Diane Burton Robb.  According to www.understood.org, the following information can be noted about this book:

Adam has been having trouble with reading for a while, and in third grade he still can’t read on his own. Adam is finally diagnosed with dyslexia and his teachers put a plan in place. In The Alphabet War, kids get to see how Adam learns to match letters to sounds. It’s not easy, but he works hard. He also starts focusing on what he’s good at—and realizes he’s smart in other ways besides reading.

This book is appropriate for children between the ages of 7 to 10 years of age.

Thank you, Mr. Falker

According to www.understood.org, the third book suitable for children and their parents is called “Thank you, Mr. Falker,” by Patricia Polacco.  According to  www.understood.org, the following information can be mentioned about this book:

Trisha struggles to read and she’s ashamed about it. Kids at school call her dumb and she thinks they’re right. She feels lonely and rejected. But then, in fifth grade, a very special teacher recognizes her amazing artistic talent—and her reading disability. He steps in to gently guide and support her. Slowly, Trisha begins to blossom—hence the gratitude of this touching best-seller’s title, “Thank You, Mr. Falker.” The story may be especially poignant because it’s autobiographical.

This book is appropriate for children between the ages of 5 to 8 years of age.

Conclusion

To end this article, three more books have been mentioned for children and their parents to enjoy.