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Brain Images In ADHD

Introduction.

Have you ever wondered what goes on in the brain of an individual with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder?  Continue reading this article to find out.  According to www.sciencedaily.com, “Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with the delayed development of five brain regions and should be considered a brain disorder, according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry.”

A Study Conducted With Individuals With ADHD

A study was conducted on individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and individuals without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  According to www.sciencedaily.com, the following information about the study is worth noting:

The new international study measured differences in the brain structure of 1,713 people with a diagnosis of ADHD and 1,529 people without, all aged between four and 63 years old.  All 3,242 people had an MRI scan to measure their overall brain volume, and the size of seven regions of the brain that were thought to be linked to ADHD — the pallidum, thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and hippocampus. The researchers also noted whether those with ADHD had ever taken psychostimulant medication, for example Ritalin.

What Was The Outcome Of The Study

According towww.sciencedaily.com, the following information can be concluded:

The study found that overall brain volume and five of the regional volumes were smaller in people with ADHD — the caudate nucleus, putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus.

The differences observed were most prominent in the brains of children with ADHD, but less obvious in adults with the disorder. Based on this, the researchers propose that ADHD is a disorder of the brain, and suggest that delays in the development of several brain regions are characteristic of ADHD.

Besides the caudate nucleus and putamen, for which previous studies have already shown links to ADHD, researchers were able to conclusively link the amygdala, nucleus accumbens and hippocampus to ADHD.

The researchers hypothesise that the amygdala is associated with ADHD through its role in regulating emotion, and the nucleus accumbens may be associated with the motivation and emotional problems in ADHD via its role in reward processing. The hippocampus’ role in the disorder might act through its involvement in motivation and emotion.

Conclusion

This article explored details about a study that was conducted on individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  The findings of the study concluded that, according to www.sciencedaily.com, the caudate nucleus, putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus are smaller in individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in contrast to individuals who do not have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

 

Brain Images In ADHD


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2017). Brain Images In ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 19, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2017/02/brain-images-in-adhd/

 

Last updated: 21 Feb 2017
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.