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Tips To Getting Started To Achieving Your Goals With ADHD


Introduction

One of the symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is difficulty completing tasks.  Hence, this correlates to difficulty achieving one’s goals.  Are you tired of not achieving your goals?  If so, continue reading this article.  This article will provide the reader with tips to achieve goals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Prioritize Your Goals

One important way to achieve your goals is to prioritize your goals.  According to adhdandyou.com, “The patient, parent, or caregiver should set their goals, choosing what is most important or what makes sense chronologically, keeping motivation in mind.”  In other words, it is essential to pick a goal that you know you can achieve.  Do not pick any goal.  Pick one that you know you can set your mind out to and accomplish in a sufficient, timely manner.

Expectations

In addition to prioritizing your goals, it is also essential to not set your expectations too high in order to achieve your goals.  According to adhdandyou.com, “Try not to set expectations too high. If the patient, parent, or caregiver reaches too high and comes up short, there may be disappointment. However, if expectations are lowered and the goal is reached, the patient and/or parent or caregiver may be happier. Perspective is important.”  To explain further, if you set your expectations too high, you may run the risk of disappointment.  Try to set your expectations just right.  Set them to the point where you know you can succeed not where someone else can succeed.

Take Small Steps

In addition to prioritizing your goals and setting your expectations at just the right point, another way to achieve your goals is to take small steps at a time.  According to adhdandyou.com, “Break down goals into smaller, more manageable steps. Even the largest, most overwhelming changes are made only 1 step at a time.”  In other words, break your goals down into steps.  No goal is too hard to accomplish as long as it is manageable.  Make your goal manageable.

Begin with a quick success

On a final note, according to adhdandyou.com, “Choose a goal that can be accomplished quickly. This quick success can help feed the cycle of success. Try not to tackle the toughest goal first. Instead, “practice” first on some of the easier goals to help build self-confidence.”  In other words, begin with a quick success.  Choose a goal that you know you can accomplish.  If it is taking too long to accomplish, it may not be the right goal for you.  Find one that is right for you.

Conclusion

This article has provided the reader with ways to achieve his or her goals, including prioritizing your goals, setting expectations at just the right amount, taking small steps, in addition to beginning with quick success.

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Tips To Getting Started To Achieving Your Goals With ADHD


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). Tips To Getting Started To Achieving Your Goals With ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 4, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/11/tips-to-getting-started-to-achieving-your-goals-with-adhd/

 

Last updated: 20 Nov 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.