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What Are The Similarities Between Autism And ADHD?


similarities between autism and ADHDIntroduction

You may have heard some individuals say Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are similar to one another and even further individuals can be diagnosed with both disorders.  Is this even possible?  According to understood.org, “Experts recently changed the way they think about how autism and ADHD are related. Not so long ago, the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) stated that a person couldn’t have autism and ADHD. But the newest version (called DSM-5) allows for a person to be diagnosed with both.”  With that said, not only are Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder similar to one another, an individual can also be diagnosed with both disorders, as well.  The question remains how are they similar to one another.  This article will answer this particular question and describe some of the similarities between Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Trouble Paying Attention

According to pearsonclinical.com, one of the symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is “difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (e.g., has difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading).”  In addition, trouble paying attention is also a symptom of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  According to understood.org, “Kids with autism may struggle with this for several reasons. One is that language difficulties can make it seem like a child isn’t paying attention to directions. But the truth may be that he just doesn’t understand the directions.”  Therefore, to explain further, a similarity between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder is trouble paying attention during tasks.

Trouble With Social Interactions

In addition to trouble paying attention, another similarity between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder is trouble with social interactions.  According to understood.org, this appears in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder through not seeming “to listen when spoken to directly (e.g., mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of any obvious distraction).”  In Autism Spectrum Disorder, according to understood.org, “People on the spectrum have difficulty establishing and maintaining relationships. They do not respond to many of the non-verbal forms of communication that many of us take for granted, like facial expressions, physical gestures and eye contact.”

Conclusion

Therefore, on an end note, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder share some similarities with each other, including difficulty paying attention on every day tasks and difficulty with social interaction.

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What Are The Similarities Between Autism And ADHD?


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). What Are The Similarities Between Autism And ADHD?. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 13, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/09/what-are-the-similarities-between-autism-and-adhd/

 

Last updated: 23 Sep 2016
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