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The Differences Between ADHD And Anxiety


differences between ADHD and anxietyIntroduction

In my previous article entitled, “The Similarities Between ADHD and Anxiety,” I discussed the similarities between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Anxiety.  According to theydiffer.com, “Anxiety and ADHD, or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, are often confused with each other. These two mental conditions have a similar set of symptoms, but are caused by different processes. People with ADHD can easily become anxious. ADHD often causes anxiety, but anxiety is not necessarily a prerequisite for ADHD. 25 percent of children with ADHD show symptoms of anxiety as well. Because of the similarity of symptoms, it is important to distinguish between anxiety and ADHD.”  In this article, in contrast, I will describe the differences between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Anxiety.

What Are The Differences Between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder And Anxiety?

According to theydiffer.com, the following chart has been provided to show the distinguishing differences between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Anxiety:

Anxiety ADHD
Symptoms include physical illnesses Normally,  symptoms do not include physical illnesses
Inability to concentrate is caused by worry Inability to concentrate is accompanied by physical movements
There are more individuals suffering from anxiety than from ADHD There are fewer individuals suffering from ADHD than from anxiety Source

Therefore, to recap, symptoms associated with anxiety may include a physical illness such as a headache, while symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder many not include physical illnesses.  In addition, in an anxiety disorder, an inability to concentrate may be caused by worry and restlessness, while in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder an inability to concentrate may be caused by agitation and physical movements.  On an even further note, it can also be concluded that there are more individuals suffering from Anxiety than Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Conclusion

To end this particular article, it can be concluded that Anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are different from one another.  Even though my previous article provided evidence supporting the point that Anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are similar, this article holds the opposite stance.  To support my point further, symptoms associated with anxiety may include physical illnesses and an inability to concentrate.  On an even further note, symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder normally do not include physical illnesses.  In addition, in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, symptoms may be due to physical movements and agitation.  Even though Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Anxiety are similar in some ways, they are also different in some ways, as well.

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The Differences Between ADHD And Anxiety


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). The Differences Between ADHD And Anxiety. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 8, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/09/the-differences-between-adhd-and-anxiety/

 

Last updated: 16 Sep 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.