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The Correlation Between Dopamine And ADHD

the correlation between dopamine and ADHDIntroduction

You may heard people talk about dopamine and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder together.  You may wonder why.  Well, the answer is there is a correlation between dopamine and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  This article will describe the connection between dopamine and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, the symptoms of deficiencies in dopamine, as well as provide readers with useful ways to increase dopamine levels naturally.

What Is The Connection Between Dopamine And Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder?

What is the connection between Dopamine and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder?  Well, according to medpagetoday.com, “Brain scans of unmedicated adults with ADHD showed lower dopamine receptor levels in the midbrain (P=0.01) and accumbens (P=0.004) — key regions in the dopamine reward pathway — than in controls, Nora D. Volkow, MD, of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and colleagues found.  Low dopamine receptor availability in these brain regions was significantly linked to poorer attention scores in ADHD, they reported in the Sept. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.  “This could provide an explanation of why the attentional deficits in individuals with ADHD are most evident in tasks that are considered boring, repetitive, and uninteresting (i.e., tasks or assignments that are not intrinsically rewarding),” the researchers wrote.”  To explain this reasoning further, based on this information provided above, it can be inferred that low dopamine levels are associated with individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

What Are The Symptoms Of Deficiencies In Dopamine?

Believe it or not many of the symptoms of deficiencies in dopamine are similar to depression.  According to bebrainfit.com, the following are the symptoms of deficiencies in dopamine:

  • lack of motivation
  • fatigue
  • apathy
  • procrastination
  • inability to feel pleasure
  • low libido
  • sleep problems
  • mood swings
  • hopelessness
  • memory loss
  • inability to concentrate

How Can You Receive Dopamine In Your Diet Naturally Without Prescription Medication?

If you are looking to increase your dopamine levels without the use of prescription medication such as stimulants, try these foods, drinks, and spices know to increase dopamine, according to bebrainfit.com:

 

  • almonds
  • apples
  • avocado
  • bananas
  • beets
  • chocolate
  • coffee
  • fava beans
  • green leafy vegetables
  • green tea
  • lima beans
  • oatmeal
  • sea vegetables
  • sesame and pumpkin seeds
  • turmeric
  • watermelon
  • wheat germ

Conclusion

A connection does indeed exist with Dopamine and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  To be specific, individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have a tendency to have lower dopamine levels than individuals without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  As stated in this article, natural remedies can help.

Maria Schmitt/Bigstock

The Correlation Between Dopamine And ADHD


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). The Correlation Between Dopamine And ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on January 24, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/09/the-correlation-between-dopamine-and-adhd/

 

Last updated: 20 Sep 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.