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Preparing For The School Year With ADHD


preparing for school with ADHDIntroduction

It is that time of year again. The summer months are winding down, and before you know it the school year will be beginning once again. This can be an exciting time of year for some individuals. However, for some individuals it can also be a stressful time of year, especially for parents with children who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Children who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder can experience difficulty in the classroom, and this can lead to poor performances in school. This can lead to poor self-esteem for the children themselves. However, it can also impact the parents of the children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, as well. How do you prepare for the school you for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder? This article will answer this question. It will provide the reader with some tips for parents to settle into the school year to better enable children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to succeed in a classroom setting.

First And Foremost Talk To Your Child

You as a parent may be nervous about the upcoming school year. However, imagine how your child feels. First and foremost, before you do anything else, talk to your child. Ask your child how they feel? Ask your child if they have any worries or concerns? It is important to ask your child if they have any worries or concerns. However, it is important not to just focus on the negative aspect of the situation too much. According to additudemag.com, it is recommended to focus on your child’s strengths as well. Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have the ability to be creative and smart in their own special ways. Acknowledge this in your child. Encourage your child and reaffirm your child that they are going to succeed with the help they need throughout the school year.

Schedule A Meeting With Your Child’s Teacher

After talking to your child, schedule a meeting with your child’s teacher. According to additudemag.com, building rapport with your child’s teacher is essential to a successful school year. While meeting with your child’s teacher, explain your expectations for your child and also find out the expectations of your child’s teacher for your child. Try to encourage your child’s teacher to find a balance between your needs as a parent and his/her needs as a teacher. Also, inform your child’s teacher about your child’s accommodations concerning medication. Do not make the assumption that she already knows this information.

Conclusion

With the right accommodations and encouragement your child will succeed during the school year. The beginning of the school year can be a stressful time for someone battling Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Change can be difficult. With the right amount of support, success is possible.

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Preparing For The School Year With ADHD


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). Preparing For The School Year With ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 4, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/08/preparing-for-the-school-year-with-adhd/

 

Last updated: 22 Aug 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.