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How ADHD Can Impact Your Self-Esteem


Introduction

Your disorganized, fidgety, restless, and anxious. How do you feel? Is your self-esteem high or low? Your self-esteem is most likely low. This article will focus on the self-esteem of individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. This article will address why individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have a tendency to have low self-esteem.

Difficulty With Organization

One reason why individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have low self-esteem is because they have a tendency to experience difficulty with organization. Think about it. If you are constantly experiencing difficulty organizing your room at home, your desk at work, your house in general, is your self-esteem going to be high? No. Your self-esteem is going to be low. Plus, you are going to be anxious and miserable, as well. To put it simply, individuals’ lack of abilities to stay organized with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder can impact their levels of self-esteem.

Difficulty Remembering Important Tasks

In addition to experiencing difficulty with organizational skills, individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder also have a tendency to experience difficulty remembering important tasks. If you are experiencing difficulty remembering important tasks in your daily routine, you are going to feel ashamed of yourself. You are going to regret the mistakes you have made. This leads to poor self-esteem.

Difficulty Performing Well In School

In addition to experiencing difficulty with organization and remembering important tasks, children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may also experience difficulty in the classroom. They may experience difficulty concentrating during classes. When you experience difficulty concentrating during class time you are not going to absorb the material. With that said, you are not going to do well on the exams. Especially for a child, this leads to poor self-esteem.

Difficulty Interacting With Family Members And Peers

In addition to experiencing difficulty with organization, remembering important tasks, and performing well in school, individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may also experience difficulty interacting with family members and peers. A symptom of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is lack of boundaries and not picking up on social cues. This combination can lead to difficulty in relationships and interacting in general with others, which can lead to low-self esteem.

Conclusion

This article has discussed why individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder can experience low self-esteem. However, despite this evidence, there is no reason to feel overwhelmed. With the right combination of medication and therapy your symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder can be managed.

How ADHD Can Impact Your Self-Esteem


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). How ADHD Can Impact Your Self-Esteem. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 3, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/08/how-adhd-can-impact-your-self-esteem/

 

Last updated: 11 Aug 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.