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The Differences Between ADHD And Executive Function Disorder

ADHD or executive function disorder?Introduction

According to c8sciences.com, “While they share some of their respective symptoms, the definitions of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Executive Function Disorder aren’t quite the same. There is a definite difference between ADHD and Executive Function Disorder. A child or adult with ADHD might be hyperactive, inattentive, and/or impulsive, and while clinicians have always had a grasp on impulsivity and hyperactivity, the concept of inattention has evolved from a simple focus on “inability to stay on task” to a broader concept of “executive functioning”. Executive Functioning problems involve a pattern of chronic difficulties in executing daily tasks.” With that said, this article will describe the difference between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Executive Function Disorder.

Defining Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

According to c8sciences.com, “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is one of the most frequently-occurring brain-based disorders. It most often manifests itself in childhood and continues to pose challenges throughout adolescence and into adulthood.” The following symptoms are present in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to name a few:

  • Difficulty getting and staying focused
  • Modulating attention
  • Controlling impulsivity
  • Self-managing behavior

Defining Executive Function Disorder

According to webmd.com, Executive function pertains to the following areas:

  • Manage time
  • Pay attention
  • Switch focus
  • Plan and organize
  • Remember details
  • Avoid saying or doing the wrong thing
  • Do things based on your experience

According to c8sciences.com, “Wouldn’t it make sense, then, that someone experiencing issues with executive functioning may have problems analyzing, planning, organizing, scheduling and completing tasks? Children and adults with EFD exhibit issues with organizing materials and setting schedules; they misplace papers, reports and other school materials and often times will have similar problems keeping track of their personal items or even keeping their bedroom organized. No matter how hard they try, the failure rate remains.” With that said, children and adults with Executive Function Disorder have difficulty with organization and setting schedules.

Conclusion

With that said, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Executive Function Disorder are similar to one another. However, it is also important to note that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Executive Function Disorder are also different from one another. To be specific, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity focuses on staying focused on tasks. In contrast to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Executive Function Disorder focuses more on completing tasks. Therefore, to conclude this article, on a final note, similarities do exist between Executive Function Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder but so do differences, as well.

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The Differences Between ADHD And Executive Function Disorder


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). The Differences Between ADHD And Executive Function Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 7, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/07/the-differences-between-adhd-and-executive-function-disorder/

 

Last updated: 21 Jul 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.