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The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults

Introduction

You may have heard of assessment instruments for Mood Disorders but are wondering if there are assessment instruments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The answer is yes. This article will explore details surrounding one of them. This one is called the Brown Rating Scale For ADHD. This article will describe information about the Brown Rating Scale, particularly for Adolescents and Adults.

What Is The Structure Of The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults?

According to drthomasebrown.com, the Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents and Adults contains “40 items that assess five clusters of ADHD-related executive function impairments.” It is also important to note that the Brown Rating Scale For children between the ages of 3 to 12 yrs includes a sixth cluster to assess problems in monitoring and self-regulating action.

What Does The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults Assess For?

According to drthomasebrown.com, “For adolescents (12-18 yrs) and for adults, normal rating scales elicit self-report and collateral report on a single form.” Therefore, the Brown Rating Scale for Adolescents and Children assesses for information on a single form. However, what does this scale assess for? According to http://www.drthomasebrown.com/assessment-tools/, the Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Children assess for the following information:

  • Organizing, Prioritizing and Activating to Work
  • Focusing, Sustaining and Shifting Attention to Tasks
  • Regulating Alertness, Sustaining Effort and Processing Speed
  • Managing Frustration and Modulating Emotions
  • Utilizing Working Memory and Accessing Recall
  • Monitoring and Self-Regulating Action

Therefore, the Brown Rating Scale for Children and Adolescents assesses for a wide variety of clinical information.

How Does The Software For The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults Work?

According to drthomasebrown.com, the software for the Brown Rating Scale For Children and Adolescents “provides an easy and convenient way to record an individual’s responses to any of the Brown ADD Scales and instantly generate an individualized narrative and graphic report.” Therefore, the software for the Brown Rating Scale for Children and Adolescents is convenient and practical to use. Consider using it.

Conclusion

To conclude this article, medications and different types of therapy can be used to treat the symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. However, consider using the Brown Rating Scale for Children and Adolescents to assess for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. This assessment tool is practical and convenient and assesses for a wide variety of information, pertaining to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Plus, it contains computer software, as well.  It is quite efficient.

 

The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). The Brown Rating Scale For Adolescents And Adults. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 24, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/06/the-brown-rating-scale-for-adolescents-and-adults/

 

Last updated: 29 Jun 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.