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Differentiating Between ADHD And Autism Spectrum Disorder

autism vs. ADHDIntroduction

In my previous article I described the similarities between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. In contrast to mentioning the similarities between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder, I will mention the differences between the two disorders in this article. This article will describe the differences in the types of therapy for the two disorders, as well as the differences in the communication skills exhibited in these two disorders.

Different Types Of Therapy

It is important to note that different types of therapy are used for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. According to understood.org, “There are also big differences in the type of therapy recommended for each. Therapy for autism like Applied Behavior Analysis can be used to help with communication skills. It can also help reduce repetitive behaviors, which is one of the hallmarks of autism. Therapy for ADHD is geared toward improving attention and organization. This therapy is often paired with ADHD medication. But this medication may not help kids who don’t have ADHD.” With that said, different types of therapy are used for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Communication Skills

In addition to mentioning the different types of therapies used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder, it is important to note that the communication skills exhibited between someone with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder are also different. According to healthcentral.com, “A child with ADHD may have some communication difficulties or trouble grasping some aspects of language especially if they have a co-morbid condition of a learning disability or speech problems. Yet overall, the child with autism is going to have more significant communication difficulties. These difficulties are not limited to expressive language. The child with autism may have great challenges in deciphering body language, facial expressions, tone of voice, sarcasm, and other elements of non-verbal communication. They may have difficulty with pragmatic language skills or those aspects of interpersonal communication such as all the unwritten rules of how to carry on a conversation. The communication difficulties of the child with ADHD are not going to be as pervasive as with autism.” Therefore, the communication skills between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder are different.

Conclusion

To conclude this article, two differences between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder have been mentioned. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder are different based on types of therapy and communication skills.

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Differentiating Between ADHD And Autism Spectrum Disorder


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). Differentiating Between ADHD And Autism Spectrum Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 21, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/living-with-adhd/2016/06/differentiating-between-adhd-and-autism-spectrum-disorder/

 

Last updated: 18 Jun 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.