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Coping with Challenges

The Tetris Effect, and Why You See What You Look For

    One of the seven principles Shawn Achor, the author of, The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work describes in his book is called the Tetris Effect (Achor, 2010). If you have ever played the game Tetris you will instantly recognize why. Tetris is a seemingly simple game in which four different shapes fall from the top of the screen and the player rotates or moves them to fit in with the other pieces such that an unbroken line appears. When this happens, that line disappears creating more room on the screen with which to fill up with more shapes.


Coping with Challenges

Skin in the Game

It is what separates the good players from the great players. It is what helps us master thoughts and emotions. It is the basis of reaching our goals. And, we can hack it. It takes just five minutes a day according to an article in Psychology Today.


Coping with Challenges

The Art Of Pacing

    When I was running ultramarathon races, I used to pride myself on my ability to leave some gas in the tank and finish the race on a high. When I was working with trauma clients, I used to love learning with them how to contain emotions, build confidence, and each day take on a little more.


Coping with Challenges

Mindset, Interpretations, and Leverage

    It’s hard to talk about happiness without acknowledging that we are not all dealt the same stack of cards and life events can sometimes seriously interrupt our happiness attempts. Interpretations do matter and can mean the difference between thinking of imprisonment as, well, imprisonment, and a "glorious experience" -- as described by Morese Bickham who spent 37 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit.


Coping with Challenges

Clear Goals, Immediate Feedback, and Realizing Our Potential: The Hidden Power of Mastery

  In his enthralling book, The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance, Steven Kotler, describes mastery as a euphoric experience, and one that transforms us. He writes, “When doing what we love transforms us into the best possible version of ourselves and that version hints at even greater future possibilities, the urge to explore those possibilities becomes feverish compulsion” (Kotler, 2014).