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Talking About Recovery

Talking About Recovery

It’s hard to talk about our feelings. Some words don’t put the true nature of the feelings into a context for others to comprehend. The truth is we might not understand our feelings or moods well enough to verbalize them.

Emotions are a fickle bunch of instinctive or intuitive feelings mixed with characteristics of one’s state of mind. The feelings are linked to one’s circumstances, mood, or relationships with people even animate or inanimate objects.

In short, very few of us lack emotional connections and many times emotions get the best of us to some degree or another.

For me, recovery will always be a process.  But sharing that process is a key to success or key learning from recovery’s failure.

In 2012, SAMHSA established a working definition of recovery.  Recovery is defined as the following:

 “recovery as a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live self-directed lives and strive to reach their full potential. Recovery is built on access to evidence-based clinical treatment and recovery support services for all populations”. Learn more about SAMHSA’s Working Definition of Recovery — 2012.

Recovery in “which individuals improve their health and wellness” does not mean recovery is a cure from our mental health diagnosis. No, rather it correctly identifies it as an “improvement”.  However little or incremental the improvement is…it’s all part of recovery.

For many of us, we want to see BIG changes right away; we want to be in recovery. I feel the fact that we are conscious of our need for change in of itself identifies us in recovery.

If we could only take five baby steps a day toward our recovery in a year, we would be three-quarters of a mile away for where we started. The point is, recovery is movement. We may never get what we lost. We may never find the answer to the puzzle, but we can play the game. We can move and make a small incremental change that adds up to being miles away from where we began.

How is your recovery improving your mood?

What part of your recovery do you find most challenging?

Road To Recovery  | Talking About Recovery

Chato Stewart

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Originally Posted at Chato Stewart’s Mental Health Humor at Psych Central: https://blogs.psychcentral.com/humor

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https://blogs.psychcentral.com/humor/2018/09/hopes-dreams-depression-meds/
Over-medicated.com
We’ve talked about taking medication the last few blog posts.  Whether you are for medication or for something stronger and all natural like COFFEE, I feel it’s a personal choice.

Reference
Stewart, Chato. (2018). Psych Central. Retrieved on Jan 1, 2019, from  https://blogs.psychcentral.com/humor/ 

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Talking About Recovery


Chato Stewart

Chato Stewart has a mission, to draw and use humor as a positive tool to live, to cope with the debilitating effects symptoms of mental illness. Chato Stewart is a Mental Health Hero and Advocate. Recovery Peer Specialist board-certified in Florida. Chato is the artist behind the cartoons series Mental Health Humor, Over-Medicated, and The Family Stew - seen here in his blog posts. The cartoons are drawn from his personal experience of living with bipolar disorder (and other labels). info@mentalhealthhumor.com


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APA Reference
Stewart, C. (2019). Talking About Recovery. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 20, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/humor/2019/01/talking-about-recovery/

 

Last updated: 2 Jan 2019
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.