Mental Health Humor and psychological disorder humor and cartoons by Chato Stewart

Mental Health Humor and psychological disorder humor and cartoons by Chato Stewart

We all have a moral compass. We use, choose to use or ignore it with every ethical, moral, spiritual, behavioural, etc. decision we face each day.  Depending on how your moral compass is configured and gauged– is how you ultimately handle and live with each choice large and small.

It could be as simple as what you would do when your sibling gets an over-sized “congratulations” cookie for finishing 5th grade and leaves it on the table…. Do you take a huge piece of it when nobody’s watching? Or do you ask? Or…

You’re at a mall  sitting in the food court and see a wallet on the floor with a stack of $100.00.  – What do you do? It’s Finder Keepers time? Or do you look in the wallet for an id or business card? You try to find the owner of the wallet and every penny?  And when you do find the owner, DO you take a reward?  Come on, the owner owes you right, all the leg work and time to find them… But what if you just found their mortgage payment or rent?  Taking one dollar would make them short.

Is Our Moral Compass Working?

Not everyone’s moral compass works the same, or at all…many are off course. Some moral compasses are so broken, there is just no hope for repair – as depicted in the Mental Health Humor Cartoon “Moral Compass” is just broken.  We need to reset our moral compass from time to time.  While it can be rightfully said though our moral compass is our conscience.  And I believe our conscience is a God given gift, but our moral compass is the human factor that when not calibrated to the  proper navigational point of “basic” righteousness, compassion and human dignity…that when tested, true colors of our “immoral compass” are revealed.

Our  moral compass  has nothing to do with mental illness as I see it. Our compass/conscience, however, can be influenced by exposure to religion, philosophies, prejudices, and wrong desires. Our moral compass has more to do with our overall personality trait.  

Yes, true, many mental disorder can WITHOUT A DOUBT influence and compound our moral compass (our conscience)  –  While personalities can change and be adjusted, but the negative effects of Bipolar, Depression and many other diagnoses– will crush our personalities with shame, guilt and hate. They have long-term effects.  I was once very “extraverted ” but today I am more introverted.  

What is your moral compass calibrated to? Maybe your personality type will help you better calibrate your moral compass.  But what is our personality type? I found a personality test on-line…

Jungian 16-Type Personality Test -New! (PSYCH CENTRAL TEST)
A 64-question test that scores your personality traits as one of the MBTI 16 types. My results:

ISTP - The Mechanic

ISTP – The Mechanic

Quiet and reserved, interested in how and why things work. Excellent skills with mechanical things. Risk-takers who they live for the moment. Usually interested in and talented at extreme sports. Uncomplicated in their desires. Loyal to their peers and to their internal value systems, but not overly concerned with respecting laws and rules if they get in the way of getting something done. Detached and analytical, they excel at finding solutions to practical problems.

 

Logician-personality

 

INTP PERSONALITY (“THE LOGICIAN”)

The INTP personality type is fairly rare, making up only three percent of the population, which is definitely a good thing for them, as there’s nothing they’d be more unhappy about than being “common”. INTPs pride themselves on their inventiveness and creativity, their unique perspective and vigorous intellect. Usually known as the philosopher, the architect, or the dreamy professor, INTPs have been responsible for many scientific discoveries throughout history.

http://www.16personalities.com/intp-personality