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8 Reasons to Celebrate Love

 

I'll Give You All I Can...

Valentine’s Day may be one of your favorite holidays. You see it as an occasion to celebrate your relationship. Or maybe you think Valentine’s Day is just a tool for businesses to sell cards, flowers and chocolates. Whatever your view of the day, there are some strong reasons to celebrate love.

1.  If you are good at connecting people, then you are likely to be a happier person. Whether it’s a business, friendship or romantic connection, introducing people who form a relationship is good for you.  Your happiness is increased when the introduction is successful, so it’s also a bit risky.

2.  A 75-year long study done at Harvard was dedicated to finding the secrets to a happy life.  George Vaillant, the head of the study, said the  most important finding is that the only thing that matters in life is relationships. Happiness, according to his study, is about the love in your life and finding a way to cope with life so you don’t push love away.

3.  Having relationships in your life will make you happier. These relationships provide you with validation of your value and competence. The relationships don’t have to be family or friends in any particular balance–just close relationships.

4.  Love and passion inspire people to great accomplishments.  Think about people who have made a positive difference in the world. Many of them were driven by their love for humanity.

5.  There’s evidence that relationships decrease your stress and improve your physical health.

6. Loving connections with others can help erase the emptiness some people feel.

7.  Having close relationships enhances the positives that you experience and helps minimize the pain of the negatives.

8.  Relationships with pets make us happier too.  Loving a pet counts.

You can probably add other benefits to this list. Knowing that you have support and “belong” is a key step toward your well being. For emotionally sensitive people, the vulnerability required to create close relationships can be daunting. Staying isolated may seem safer. In this case that may be short-term thinking, perhaps based on fear. Short-term thinking means that your decision to isolate may appear more desirable right now, but that decision does not work well in the long run. Part of establishing and keeping relationships is a willingness to think about the bigger picture and stay focused on the long-term benefits. If you decide to build relationships in your life, take small steps and be compassionate with yourself. Building relationships is difficult and the benefits are significant.

Survey:  If you are an emotionally sensitive person who does not have a mental health diagnosis, please consider completing our survey to help us learn more about emotional sensitivity.  Thank you.

 

Photo Credit:  Brandon Warren via Compfight

8 Reasons to Celebrate Love


Karyn Hall, PhD

Karyn Hall, Ph.D. is the owner/director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Center in Houston, a DBT-Linehan Board of Certification, Certified Clinician, a RO DBT Approved Supervisor and Trainer and owner of www.DBTSkillscoaching.com, an online educational program. She is a trainer/consultant as well as a therapist and certified coach, author of The Emotionally Sensitive Person, SAVVY, Mindfulness Exercises for DBT Therapists, and co-author of The Power of Validation. Her podcast, The Emotionally Sensitive Person, is available on iTunes.


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APA Reference
Hall, K. (2014). 8 Reasons to Celebrate Love. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 15, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/emotionally-sensitive/2014/02/8-reasons-to-celebrate-love/

 

Last updated: 12 Feb 2014
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.