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The Psychology of Dreams

Dreams

 

“Dreams are the guiding words of the soul. Why should I henceforth not love my dreams and not make their riddling images into objects of my daily consideration?”
—Carl Jung

 

Autumn really is my favorite time of year, but the shorter days and longer nights really don’t go well with this bipolar brain of mine – at first. Because I have been doing so well with self care and managing my illness, saying no and making sure not to over extend myself (especially after that mixed episode awhile back) my symptoms have shown up in a strange new ways. I am struggling with sleep issues again, but it’s not typical insomnia like when I’m fighting mania. I’m falling asleep just fine, it’s dreams that are waking me and I’m having a terrible time getting back to sleep after these dreams, and we all know how important sleep is to a healthy life, especially one battling bipolar disorder.

These dreams that I have been having have been powerfully vivid. What is keeping me up after is reflecting on these dreams, so I have decided it’s time to start a journal and call a psychotherapist that I was referred to last year for a few sessions to talk specifically about dreams. I spoke briefly with my psychiatrist last year about dreams after she prescribed me a smoking cessation medication which contributed to my autumn depression a great deal, but gave me some intense dreams, and we covered the basics about dreams and psychology and it peaked my interest enough to find a woman who specializes in this area.

 

Dreams have fascinated people from all walks of life since the beginning of time. Some Shamans believe that dreams are messages sent to us either from our own spirit, helping or guiding spirits, or energies wishing to block us from our destinies.

 

“I think; therefore I am.”

—Rene Descartes

 

The Egyptians and Greeks believed that our dreams contained messages from The Gods but the Greek philosopher, Aristotle believed that dreams were not messages sent from Gods but that our own imaginations were the messengers. Another Greek philosopher, Artemidorus published a series of books on the interpretation of dreams translated to ‘Oneirocrtica’ in which he used the context of dreams to predict future events among other notable events. Some say he began the basis of scientific dream analysis with his publications.

For Native American and Aboriginal People dreams have always held a very powerful spiritual connection to their Heritage. First Nations are rich in culture and each hold specific beliefs according to their own customs and traditions. In the Ojibwa spiritual teachings, it is the soul that dreams the dream, not the body.

 

Dream Analysis In Therapy

 

Sigmund Freud, the founding father of psychoanalysis, used dream analysis as a way to decode whatever he believed the ego was repressing. He is very well known to have believed that most of our repressed desires had something to do with a sexual nature, trauma or something retrospective. His arguably greatest published work, ‘The Interpretation of Dreams’ at first wasn’t very well received, it has since become a go to basis for many dream analysis therapies.

The therapist that I will be seeing practices Jungian Dream therapy. I think she and I hit it off last year as well as we did because I find Carl Jung to be one of the most fascinating men who has contributed so much to the field of psychology. Carl Jung did not agree with Freud when it came to dreams. He believed that our dreams were a window to our unconscious mind and by studying them they could help us solve our problems in our waking life and this is exactly what I’m hoping to do with this therapist this week.

 

Whether you put any stock into what dreams may hold or just discard them when you wake up, I think there is definitely something there. I guess it’s all in your perception and whose ideas fit well within your beliefs. I wish you all the sweetest of dreams.

The Psychology of Dreams


Nicole Lyons


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APA Reference
Lyons, N. (2015). The Psychology of Dreams. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/embracing-balance/2015/10/the-psychology-of-dreams/

 

Last updated: 15 Oct 2015
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