11 thoughts on “Pulling the plug on my mania and CrossFit

  • February 9, 2015 at 12:56 pm

    I enjoyed this and so glad you are able to recognize and bring your life down a notch. Sometimes recognizing is half the battle.

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  • February 9, 2015 at 6:39 pm

    You got 74th and you aren’t doing it because of some fool at the dog park??? That is incredible! You are F’ing gifted! quit feeling sorry for yourself and go kick butt!!!!

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  • February 9, 2015 at 6:40 pm

    beyond incredible…

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  • February 9, 2015 at 6:40 pm

    don’t listen to these pathetic fools. you are a Crossfitter, not a loser!

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      • February 9, 2015 at 10:21 pm

        she name called you and you didn’t take the bait. I so grateful for you and how you share your insights.

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      • February 11, 2015 at 12:55 pm

        Great reply Christine! You recognize your personal mental health needs, and you’re beginning to take them seriously and with care. Just because you need to take time to tend to your needs doesn’t mean you’ll be giving up your dreams.

        Imagine how much more successful you can be, even at Crossfit, when you have control of your manic symptoms. Imagine how freeing it will be to pursue your dreams when you aren’t also losing control of self and being nasty to others.

        You’re doing the right thing, no matter what anyone says!

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      • June 28, 2017 at 11:28 am

        I was a crossfit person for a year. Absolutely, loved the box where I trained but had to quit.

        There is no doubt that it was making me way to aggressive which lead to some poor decision making.

        I still miss the challenge and how good it made me feel but it had some real negative effects on my mental abilities outside the crossfit box.

        Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 10:35 pm

    I respect your decision and I respect you. Good for you for recognizing the warning signs and reacting responsibly. I value you as a neighbor and journalist and want you to be happy. You are already a champion in my book.

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  • February 11, 2015 at 4:16 pm

    This post was triggering has hell for me. I am a crossfitter and finished 130th in my age division 45-49 last year. Did the Masters Regionals. Due to my mental health I have been unable to consitantly train. I go from extreme lows and avoiding working out to overtraining. I lost over 12lbs and my lifts dropped by 20lbs and my metabolic conditioning is down. My perfectionism and innter critic are telling me to find a way to avoid the opens all together but everyones eyes on on me to see how I do. I am going to be a big disapointment to myself and everyone around me. I try not to compare my weaknesses to other peoples stregnths. Easier said then done.

    Reply
  • November 21, 2015 at 9:06 am

    Just a note – bipolar II is absolutely NOT bipolar “lite”, nor are those with bipolar II blessed to have it rather than bipolar I. Both diseases are equally horrible to live with in their own right. While bipolar II patients don’t reach the full blown mania of bipolar I, their lows are just as low, if not lower. In fact, I have both read in the literature and been told by my own doctor (who researches at the best psychiatric department in the country) that bipolar II depression on average tends to be more severe than either unipolar or bipolar I depression. This idea that bipolar II is less severe is a widely held misconception that is harmful to patients.

    Reply
 

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