6 thoughts on “Monday, Monotony and Depression

  • April 13, 2009 at 5:12 pm

    I so know how you feel. I hate Mondays, as I’m sure most people do, but my Monday’s are certainly a constant drag (so I can certainly relate). I can’t seem to get out of that “Monday” feeling during the rest of the week. It is hard some times and it takes things such as a good treat once a week (a chocolate fudge sunday), yoga and aerobics (every morning before class, as I am in graduate school in psychology), laughing so that I don’t cry, reminding myself of the purpose for why I’ve decided to pursue a career as a psychologist so that I won’t get discouraged when I’m doing a statistical analogy or writing for my thesis, and utilizing mindful meditation every Wednesday to keep my mind “sailing” until I can get to the finish line…that is, Friday. Although some of my weekends are quite like weekdays, I’m still grateful to be able to escape for a while, even though it is usually a while.

    The stress, the depression, the migraines or physical wariness, the worrying….can all get to you and it takes a strong faith in something (for me that’s God and my love for children whom I hope to work with in my career), support from those you love, the wonderful gift of love and companionship (whether that be from a loved one, child, or spouse), and times when all there is is me (or you), my (or your) warm bath, and my (or your) classical music, to get you through it.

    Sometimes all we need is the little and beautiful things of life to give us a nudge to go a step further! That’s what gets me through my “chronic Monday’s.”

    Reply
  • April 13, 2009 at 5:20 pm

    I so know how you feel. I hate Mondays, as I’m sure most people do, but my Monday’s are certainly a constant drag (so I can certainly relate). I can’t seem to get out of that “Monday” feeling during the rest of the week. It is hard some times and it takes things such as a good treat once a week (a chocolate fudge sunday), yoga and aerobics (every morning before class, as I am in graduate school in psychology), laughing so that I don’t cry, reminding myself of the purpose for why I’ve decided to pursue a career as a psychologist so that I won’t get discouraged when I’m doing a statistical analogy or writing for my thesis, and utilizing mindful meditation every Wednesday to keep my mind “sailing” until I can get to the finish line…that is, Friday. Although some of my weekends are quite like weekdays, I’m still grateful to be able to escape for a while, even though it is usually a while.

    The stress, the depression, the migraines or physical wariness, the worrying….can all get to you and it takes a strong faith in something (for me that’s God and my love for children whom I hope to work with in my career), support from those you love, the wonderful gift of love and companionship (whether that be from a loved one, child, or spouse), and times when all there is is me (or you), my (or your) warm bath, and my (or your) classical music, to get you through it.

    Sometimes all we need is the little and beautiful things of life to give us a nudge to go a step further! That’s what gets me through my chronic Monday’s.

    Sometimes all we need are the little and beautiful things of life to give us a nudge to go just a little further. That’s what gets me through my “chronic Mondays.”

    Reply
  • April 13, 2009 at 5:21 pm

    Sorry for the repetitous posting….Computer troubles.

    Thanks

    Reply
  • May 16, 2009 at 1:49 pm

    negative thinking is like a habit–an addictive compulsive habit. as with smoking, the way to break automatic thoughts of negativity is to attack it like any bad habit. and expect that usu. it takes 21days to make a new habit. so replace the negative thoughts with positive thoughts for 21days and then maintain it. easier said than done but gradually you will notice the change over into more automatically positive thoughts. However it must be maintained once you get there because if you dont, you will return to your addiction. you know that with ETOHism.

    Reply
  • February 25, 2011 at 2:06 pm

    I am so glad I read your article about dysthymia. Now I know what it is. I have everything that I could have ever wanted wife, kids, house cars, bike, great job, health etc but the MONOTONY gets to me. Its always the same.

    Reply
  • July 5, 2011 at 7:14 am

    Furthermore, steady state endurance training only trains the heart at 1 specific heartbeat range and train it to respond to various every single day stressors. However, highly variable cyclic training teaches one’s heart to respond to and get over a number of demands making it less likely to fail when it is needed.

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