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9 Reasons for Change

reasons for changeChange is difficult.  Even if you are engaging in behaviors that you know are harmful or have symptoms that are severe, the prospect of change can be unappealing.  At these times, it can be helpful to think of reasons to make those difficult changes.

Reasons for change:

  1. You are concerned about your life, your behavior or your mental health.
  2. You are concerned about the consequences of not getting help.
  3. You are concerned about your future.
  4. You hold the belief that if you change, things will get better.
  5. You have the opportunity to change.
  6. You are being offered the resources to change or you can obtain the resources to change.
  7. You want to change or you intend to change.
  8. The positives of not making change are outweighed by your concern and the negative consequences of not making change.
  9. You are ready to change.

When you are experiencing mental health problems you may feel helpless , which can lead to hostility or passivity in response to suggestions that you change.  Motivation to change how you deal with your mental health problems is important to making difficult life changes. Often when people experience emotions like fear and shame, the tendency is to avoid problems.  Thinking about your reasons to change can give you the incentive necessary to get started.

Photo by Giulio Mola, available under a Creative Commons attribution license.

9 Reasons for Change

Christy Matta, MA


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APA Reference
Matta, C. (2011). 9 Reasons for Change. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 22, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/dbt/2011/08/9-reasons-for-change/

 

Last updated: 9 Aug 2011
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