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Do Quirks Make you Frivolous or Simply Light Hearted?

Are you all buttoned up?  Do you suppress quirks and idiosyncrasies when you’re around other people?  Is it better to get along, not stand out for being a bit odd or peculiar?  Or is there some value in eccentricity?

According to Michael Robinson of NDSU in this month’s Psychology Today, reconnecting with little quirks and oddities in your personality makes you more lighthearted and, as a result, more creative.

It’s easy to get stuck in a rut of thinking.  Work and adult responsibilities can be dull and serious.  Important meetings, keeping the kids in line and managing your home and finances can require a stern or sober demeanor.  Handling a crisis with restraint and calm is often highly valued by supervisors.

But seriousness, moderation and restraint can leave us disconnected from those oddities of our personality that make us unique and that spur us to think outside the box.

If you’re a habitual sniffler, always look to the sky to check the position of the moon, incessantly fidget, wear only new socks, dot your i’s with smiley faces, are always early or like to calculate a tip to the penny, give in to it.  See if it has an impact on your thoughts.  Do you feel less somber?  Are you better able to break out of dull and boxed-in thinking?

What odd quirks help you connect to your creativity?  Feel free to comment.

Do Quirks Make you Frivolous or Simply Light Hearted?


Christy Matta, MA


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APA Reference
Matta, C. (2010). Do Quirks Make you Frivolous or Simply Light Hearted?. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 24, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/dbt/2010/07/do-quirks-make-you-frivolous-or-simply-light-hearted/

 

Last updated: 8 Jul 2010
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.