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Creative Ideas, Creative Reboot

rising by Alice Popkorn

Creativity is one of the most joyful and meaningful parts of being alive. And for many people, creative expression is not so much a choice as a spiritual necessity.

But creative work can be emotionally challenging and stressful, and we need to renew and reboot to keep pursuing excellence.

Natural environments can both inspire creative work and provide a break from it.

Another form of creative renewal is meditation. Author Orna Ross comments:

“Even if you’ve never formally practiced meditation, you are likely to have experienced the meditative state – perhaps when walking in nature, or during sex…

“Perhaps when relaxing in the bath or when looking into the eyes of a child. Perhaps even in the midst of a busy crowd.

“Moments when the thought traffic that ordinarily stomps through your head ceases and your mind falls into stillness, into mindful being.”

She adds, “Those whose lives are most creative, in most spheres, are those who are courageous enough to bring their conscious awareness to the challenging, miraculous, moment-by-moment art of living.”

From Meditation, Stress and Being More Creative (which also includes the image below.)

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In the following article by author and mentor Julia McCutchen, she writes about her own experience of creative renewal and regaining presence to be more creative.

The Transformative Value of a Conscious and Creative Reboot

The last year has been a massive reality check for me with regard to the sheer volume of time, energy and effort that is required to see a book through from manuscript completion to successful publication.

Looking back it feels like the conscious writing process to craft the body of work that became my book was the easy part, although it didn’t always feel like that at the time!

Fortunately, my daily practice of yoga, meditation and more largely enabled me to remain present to what ‘is’ through the roller coaster ride of the publishing process.

It was a high priority for me to be connected to inner stillness amidst the array of outer activities, all of which involved absolute deadlines.

Yet as the months passed, the more fatigued I felt, the harder it became to maintain the fullness of my balanced perspective. Finally, the moment came when all the major projects were completed, the launch momentum settled and I was able to stop for more than a brief interlude.

woman-meditator-natureTaking time off to recharge was an extremely welcome immersion in the bliss of stillness, silence, space and the restorative energy of the natural world.

I subsequently felt prompted to write a short piece to share my experience and encourage you to remember the importance of what I lovingly call a conscious and creative reboot.

Here it is…

It’s so easy to become entangled in the stories of our lives. Remaining fully present through endless activities that all seem important over a prolonged period of time can be a stretch.

When our energy becomes depleted, we’re gradually drawn in to the everyday story and the spaciousness of being becomes obscured by layers of illusion which distort the clear view from the pure state.

That is until we stop.

Step back.

Let it all go at every level.

Recharge and re-immerse ourselves in the silence out of which all sounds arise, the stillness out of which all movement flows, the space out of which all phenomena manifest, and the solitude through which our innate wholeness is restored to full strength once more.

The resistance from the everyday self to this deep reconnection is huge.

Understandably, as the fierce grace of true presence dissolves the everyday banter in an instant and with it the identification we usually have with the story of who we think we are.

Our commitment to Truth needs to be strong in order for us to break free of the boundaries set by our conditioned patterns of belief and behavior which keep us stuck in the repeating cycles of everyday drama.

Releasing the sense of ourselves as the ‘doer’ creates the space within us through which life pours into spontaneous, awakened action.

The Harvest Writer by John O’NolanThis is the truth of being fully present to what is; from here, all appropriate ‘doing’ naturally emerges at the perfect moment it is required and then effortlessly passes like the clouds coming and going across a clear blue sky.

Claiming time and space to stop in order to get off the mundane merry-go-round and return to Source is like a conscious and creative reboot that is periodically essential if we are to remain in clear flow.

This is how to nurture and realize our greatest potential, make the contribution we’re here to make and grow into the fullness of who we truly are.

Dive In

Schedule some real ‘time out’ for yourself at least once in the next 7 days; and then no less than once a month from this point on.

Choose an hour, half a day, a whole day or several days depending on your current circumstances.

Immerse yourself in inner and outer stillness, silence, space, solitude and ideally nature too … and simply allow yourself to ‘be’.

Once our inner well is sufficiently refilled, new ideas naturally bubble up to the surface of our conscious awareness and are picked up through the lens of our refreshed perspective.

From here it’s a small step to the next arc of the creative spiral where we effortlessly engage with the dance of creation once more.

Q4U: Have you ever found yourself ‘running on empty’? What are your favourite ways to recharge yourself creatively? Share your reaction to this article and your experience with your fellow conscious writers below.

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© Julia McCutchen 2016. All Rights Reserved. Republished here with permission.

Julia McCutchenJulia McCutchen is an intuitive creator, writer and mentor who guides people to share their unique gifts through creating, writing and living from a conscious and vibrant connection to Truth.

A former international publisher, Julia experienced a life-changing accident in 1999 which triggered a series of major quantum leaps in her spiritual awakening.

She subsequently developed a tried and tested holistic approach to access the present and aligned state required for original creative expression in all areas of life, especially writing.

She is the founder and creative director of the International Association of Conscious & Creative Writers (IACCW) and the author of two books including Conscious Writing: Discover Your True Voice Through Mindfulness and More (Hay House).

For more articles, information and a free video series visit her site:
IACCW.com.

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The lower image (“The Harvest Writer”) is from my post The Creative Mind – Something Running All The Time.

One of the quotes in the article that I appreciate:

Musician Alanis Morissette, like many artists, identifies herself as being highly sensitive and notes about respecting her self care needs:

“I get maxed-out more quickly than some, so it’s my responsibility that I schedule little mini-breaks throughout the day, and have enough sleep.

“It’s almost incumbent on me to make sure that I take care, in a very fierce way, in order to be able to continue to write and to be the person I want to be.”

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Creative Ideas, Creative Reboot


Douglas Eby

Douglas EbyDouglas Eby, MA/Psychology, is a writer and researcher on psychology and personal development related to creativity; creator of the , and author of books including [link to book site with excerpts.]
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Some excerpts from The Creative Mind are included in his newsletter .
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APA Reference
Eby, D. (2016). Creative Ideas, Creative Reboot. Psych Central. Retrieved on January 24, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2016/05/creative-ideas-creative-reboot/

 

Last updated: 7 May 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.