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The Brain And Neurotransmitters’ Role In Depression

Introduction

Do you or a loved one suffer from depression?  Parts of the brain are impacted from depression.  This article will describe several parts of the brain that are impacted by depression, as well as the nuerotransmitters that also play a key role in depression and bipolar disorder.

The Amygdala

According towww.health.harvard.edu, the first part of the brain that is impacted by depression is the amygdala.  According to www.health.harvard.edu, the amygdala is the part of the limbic system, which “a group of structures deep in the brain that’s associated with emotions such as anger, pleasure, sorrow, fear, and sexual arousal.”  Activity in the amygdala is higher when a person is depressed.

The Thalamus

According to www.health.harvard.edu, in addition to the amygdala, the thalamus is another part of the brain that is impacted by mood disorder such as depression.  According to  www.health.harvard.edu, the thalamus receives sensory information and directs it to the appropriate part of the cerebral cortex.  According to www.health.harvard.edu, it has been stated that bipolar disorder may result from problems in the thalamus, “which helps link sensory input to pleasant and unpleasant feelings.”

The Hippocampus

In addition to the amygdala and the thalamus, according to www.health.harvard.edu, the hippocampus is the third part of the brain that is impacted by mood disorders such as depression.  According to www.health.harvard.edu, it has been stated that the hippocampus is part of the limbic system, and it has a key role in processing long-term memory.  In addition to this piece of information, according towww.health.harvard.edu, “the hippocampus is smaller in some depressed people, and research suggests that ongoing exposure to stress hormone impairs the growth of nerve cells in this part of the brain.”

Neurotransmitters Role In Depression

According to www.health.harvard.edu, nuerotransmitters also play a role in depression.

Acetylcholine

According to https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-causes-depression, Acetylcholine increases memory and is involved in learning.

Serotonin

According to www.health.harvard.edu, “serotonin helps regulate sleep, appetite, and mood and inhibits pain.”

Norepinephrine

According ton www.health.harvard.edu, Norepinephrine “constricts blood vessels, raising blood pressure.”

Conclusion

To end this article, three parts of the brain have been mentioned that play a role in depression and bipolar disorder.  According to www.health.harvard.edu, they include the amygdala, the thalamus, and the hippocampus.  In addition to the amygdala, the thalamus, and hippocampus, nuerotransmitters also play a role in the development of the brain.  According to www.health.harvard.edu, they include Acetylcholine, Serotonin, in addition to Norepinephrine.  On a final note, the parts of the brain and neurotransmitters are crucial.

 

 

 

 

The Brain And Neurotransmitters’ Role In Depression


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2017). The Brain And Neurotransmitters’ Role In Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 19, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2017/09/the-brain-and-neurotransmitters-role-in-depression/

 

Last updated: 8 Sep 2017
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.