Introduction

You may be wondering is there a correlation between Bipolar Disorder and the weather.  This article will provide supporting evidence either supporting this point or provide alternating evidence against this point.  Continue reading this article to find out which stance is taken.

Is Bipolar Disorder Related To changes In The Weather?

Is Bipolar Disorder seasonal?  To answer this question, according to psychcentral.com, the answer is not clear yet as of today’s date.  However, according to psychcentral.com, a study conducted by Myers & Davies’ from 1978 found that hospital admissions due to mania were most frequent during the summer months and least frequent during the winter months.

On an opposing note, according to psychcentral.com, Dominiak et al. (2015)  conducted a study with 2,837 hospital admissions.  Based on this study, most of the hospital admissions were patients who had manic episodes.  According to  Dominiak et al. (2015), these manic episodes were noted during the spring, summer, and midwinter months.  In contrast to Myers & Davies study where manic episodes were noticed during the summer months, the findings from Dominiak et al. (2015) concluded that manic episodes can occur during the spirng, summer, and midwinter months.  In addition, Dominiak et al. (2015) also concluded that patients were likely to be admitted to the hospital for a mixed episode during winter and late spring.  In addition, depressive episodes were most frequent during the months of spring and the fall.

What Can Be Concluded Based On The Findings Of This Article?

According to psychcentral.com, it can be argued that weather is a trigger of manic, depressive, and mixed episodes in Bipolar Disorder patients for hospital admissions and outpatient departments.  However, it is important to note that weather is not the “sole” cause of developing a manic, depressive, or mixed episode in Bipolar Disorder patients.  According to psychcentral.com, on a simple note, the weather appears to be one sole factor, or simple stated a trigger, for patients with Bipolar Disorder who develop manic, depressive, or mixed episodes.

Conclusion

To end this article, this article has provided an argument on why the weather is only a trigger for patients with Bipolar Disorder who experience manic, depressive, and mixed episodes. The findings from these two studies concluded that a manic episode may occur during any time of the year.  A mixed episode is likely to occur during winter and late spring.  In addition, a depressive episode is likely to occur during the months of spring and the fall.