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CBT For Bipolar Disorder: Part II

Introduction

In my previous article, I discussed two techniques to manage symptoms associated with Bipolar Disorder.  They included accepting your diagnosis and stabilizing your routine.  This article will expand upon this topic and include two more technique to provide treatment for Bipolar Disorder.

Monitoring Your Mood

According to everydayhealth.com, the first technique to manage symptoms associated with Bipolar Disorder is monitoring your mood.  When you are more aware of your mood, you are more in control of your mood and better able to control the changes in your mood.  According to everydayhealth.com, the following can be noted:

Monitoring your mood. This is often done using a worksheet or journal, which is kept up on a daily basis between sessions and then reviewed with your therapist. People are asked to rate their mood daily on a 0-to-10 scale, in which 0 represents “depressed,” 5 stands for “feeling OK,” and 10 is equivalent to “highly irritable or elevated mood.” The purpose is to become more aware of mood triggers and changes.

Undergoing Cognitive Restructuring

In addition to monitoring your mood, according to everydayhealth.com, another technique to manage symptoms with Bipolar Disorder is undergoing cognitive restructuring.  The cognitive part of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a key component of CBT.  Your thoughts or beliefs have a direct impact on your mood.  According to everydayhealth.com, the following can be noted about undergoing cognitive restructuring to manage symptoms associated with Bipolar Disorder:

Undergoing cognitive restructuring. This process focuses on correcting flawed thought patterns by learning how to become more aware of the role thoughts play in your mood, how to identify problematic thoughts, and how to change or correct them. The therapist teaches the patient how to scrutinize the thoughts by looking for distortions, such as all-or-nothing thinking, and generating more balanced thinking.

Conclusion

In my previous article, I discussed two cognitive behavioral techniques to manage symptoms associated with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  They included accepting your diagnosis and stabilizing your routine.  In this article, I expanded upon my previous article and mentioned two more Cognitive Behavioral Techniques to treat Bipolar Disorder.  They include monitoring your mood in addition to undergoing cognitive restructuring.  If you employ these four cognitive behavioral techniques into your daily routine, accepting your diagnosis, stabilizing your routine, monitoring your mood, in addition to undergoing cognitive restructuring, your symptoms associated with Bipolar Disorder are likely to improve.  In addition, you are likely to feel a lot better about yourself, as well.

 

 

CBT For Bipolar Disorder: Part II


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2017). CBT For Bipolar Disorder: Part II. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 23, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2017/01/cbt-for-bipolar-disorder-part-ii/

 

Last updated: 29 Jan 2017
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