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Similarities Between Depression And Anxiety

Introduction

Some people may say depression and anxiety are different from one another.  However, despite this reasoning, in this particular article, I will compare depression and anxiety, as opposed to contrast depression and anxiety.  This article will explore the similarities between depression and anxiety.

They Present With The Same Physical Symptoms

The first similarity between depression and anxiety is they present with the same physical symptoms.  According to calmclinic.com, the following can be stated about the relationship between depression and anxiety:

They sometimes even have similar physical symptoms, including:

  • Nausea and stomach issues.
  • Aches and pains for no apparent reason.
  • Headaches.

Therefore, individuals with depression and anxiety can both experience physical symptoms, such as nausea and stomach issues, aches and pains for no apparent reason, as well as headaches.

Negative Thinking

In addition to depression and anxiety both possessing physical symptoms, anxiety and depression both possess a considerable amount of negative thinking.  According to calmclinic.com, “Both involve a considerable amount of negative thinking. While those with anxiety tend to fear the future and those with depression see the future as more hopeless, both believe that the worst is likely to happen.”  Therefore, to explain further, those with depression and anxiety both have a tendency to see the future in a negative light and entail negative thinking.  Those with depression see the future as hopeless, while those with anxiety tend to fear the future.

They Are Related To The Same Neurotransmitters

In addition to presenting with the same physical symptoms and possessing both negative thinking styles, depression and anxiety also are related to the same neurotransmitters.  According to calmclinic.com, the following can be noted about the relationship between neurotransmitters for depression and anxiety:

Both anxiety and depression are related to the same neurotransmitters as well, which is one of the reasons they have similar thoughts (since neurotransmitters affect thinking and perception).

Therefore, to explain further, there is a relationship between the neurotransmitters in the brain for depression and anxiety.

Conclusion

Many people believe that depression and anxiety are different from one another.  However, this article proves otherwise.  To end this article, several examples have been demonstrated to show the similarities between depression and anxiety.  To be specific, depression and anxiety are similar to one another because they present with the same physical symptoms, a relationship with negative thinking exists between both of them.  Also, on a final note, they are related to the same neurotransmitters.

Photo by Elva Keaton

Similarities Between Depression And Anxiety


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). Similarities Between Depression And Anxiety. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 24, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2016/11/similarities-between-depression-and-anxiety/

 

Last updated: 24 Nov 2016
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.