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Bipolar Disorder Vs. Schizoaffective Disorder

bipolar vs. schizoaffectiveIntroduction

You may have heard of the disorders called Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder. Are they similar? Are they different? This article will particularly focus on the differences and define the symptoms associated with Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder.

What Is Bipolar Disorder?

According to http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder, the following symptoms are present in Bipolar Disorder:

Bipolar mania, hypomania, and depression are symptoms of bipolar disorder. The dramatic mood episodes of bipolar disorder do not follow a set pattern — depression does not always follow mania. A person may experience the same mood state several times — for weeks, months, even years at a time — before suddenly having the opposite mood. Also, the severity of mood phases can differ from person to person.

Hypomania is a less severe form of mania. Hypomania is a mood that many don’t perceive as a problem. It actually may feel pretty good. You have a greater sense of well-being and productivity. However, for someone with bipolar disorder, hypomania can evolve into mania — or can switch into serious depression.

With that said, Bipolar Disorder can consist of mania, hypomania, and depression.

What Is Schizoaffective Disorder?

According to http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Schizoaffective-Disorder, the following symptoms are present in a diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder:

  • Hallucinations, which are seeing or hearing things that aren’t there.
  • Delusions, which are false, fixed beliefs that are held regardless of contradictory evidence.
  • Disorganized thinking. A person may switch very quickly from one topic to another or provide answers that are completely unrelated.
  • Depressed mood. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder depressive type they will experience feelings of sadness, emptiness, feelings of worthlessness or other symptoms of depression.
  • Manic behavior. If a person has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder: bipolar type they will experience feelings of euphoria, racing thoughts, increased risky behavior and other symptoms of mania.

Conclusion

With that said, it can be argued that Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder are similar. However, it can also be argued that Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder are different, as well. To explain further, one distinct difference between Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder is the presence of hypomania. Hypomania is present in Bipolar Disorder. However, hypomania is not present in Schizoaffective Disorder. In addition, another distinct difference between Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder is the presence of disorganized thinking. To be specific, disorganized thinking is present in Schizoaffective Disorder but not in Bipolar Disorder.  These are two of many differences between Bipolar Disorder and Schizoaffective Disorder.

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Bipolar Disorder Vs. Schizoaffective Disorder


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). Bipolar Disorder Vs. Schizoaffective Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 16, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2016/07/bipolar-disorder-vs-schizoaffective-disorder/

 

Last updated: 21 Jul 2016
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