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A Dual Diagnosis Of ADHD And A Mood Disorder


Introduction

It is not uncommon for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to suffer from symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder but also from a Mood Disorder, as well. The question remains what type of Mood Disorders do children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder experience. This article will answer this question in detail.

What Types Of Mood Disorders Are Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Likely To Experience?

What types Mood Disorders are children likely to experience with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder? According to healthychildren.org, “The mood disorders most likely to be experienced by children with ADHD include dysthymic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and bipolar disorder. Dysthymic disorder can be characterized as a chronic low-grade depression, persistent irritability, and a state of demoralization, often with low self-esteem. Major depressive disorder is a more extreme form of depression that can occur in children with ADHD and even more frequently among adults with ADHD. Dysthymic disorder and MDD typically develop several years after a child is diagnosed with ADHD and, if left untreated, may worsen over time. Bipolar disorder is a severe mood disorder that has only recently been recognized as occurring in children.” Therefore, to explain on a further note, children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are likely to experience Dysthymic Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, in addition to Bipolar Disorder.

What Is The Treatment For a Dual Diagnosis Of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder And A Mood Disorder?

What is the treatment for a dual diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and a Mood Disorder in children? According tohealthychildren.org, “As with ADHD with anxiety disorders, treatment of ADHD with depression usually involves a broad approach. Treatment approaches may include a combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy (focusing on areas of grief, interpersonal relationships, disputes, life transitions, and personal difficulties), traditional psychotherapy (to help with self-understanding, identification of feelings, improving self-esteem, changing patterns of behavior, interpersonal interactions, and coping with conflicts), as well as family therapy when needed.” With that said, different types of therapy can be used to treat children who experience symptoms with a dual diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and a Mood Disorder.

Conclusion

To conclude this article, it is not uncommon to see symptoms associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and a Mood Disorder in children. The question remains how do you provide treatment to children with a dual diagnosis. This article has provided readers with this information.

A Dual Diagnosis Of ADHD And A Mood Disorder


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). A Dual Diagnosis Of ADHD And A Mood Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 26, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2016/06/a-dual-diagnosis-of-adhd-and-a-mood-disorder/

 

Last updated: 30 Jun 2016
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