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What Is A Mood Disorder?

Introduction

So far in this blog, I have discussed characteristics of Major Depressive Disorder and Persistent Depressive Disorder. You may be wondering what type of disorders are Major Depressive Disorder and Persistent Depressive Disorder. To answer that question, Major Depressive Disorder and Persistent Depressive Disorder are mood disorders. This article will explain what a mood disorder is, how common mood disorders are, and there relation to alcohol and substance use.

What Is A Mood Disorder?

According to http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/mood-disorders, “Mood disorders are a category of illnesses that describe a serious change in mood. Illness under mood disorders include: major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (mania – euphoric, hyperactive, over inflated ego, unrealistic optimism), persistent depressive disorder (long lasting low grade depression), cyclothymia (a mild form of bipolar disorder), and SAD (seasonal affective disorder).” Therefore, to be specific, mood disorders can include major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, persistent depressive disorder, as well as seasonal affective disorder.

How Common Are Mood Disorders?

You may be wondering how common mood disorders are. According to http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/mood-disorders, “About 20% of the U.S. population reports at least one depressive symptom in a given month, and 12% report two or more in a year. A survey conducted in 1992 found rates of major depression reaching 5% in the previous 30 days, 17% for a lifetime. Bipolar disorder is less common, occurring at a rate of 1% in the general population, but some believe the diagnosis is often overlooked because manic elation is too rarely reported as an illness.” Therefore, a diagnosis of depression is more common than a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

Is Depression Associated With Alcohol And Substance Use?

According to http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/mood-disorders, “Alcoholism and other forms of drug dependence are also related to depression. Dual diagnosis – substance abuse and another psychiatric disorder, usually a mood disorder – is an increasingly serious psychiatric concern. Whether drug abuse causes depression, depression leads to drug abuse, or both have a common cause, a vicious spiral ensues when addicts use the drugs to relieve symptoms the drugs have caused. Cocaine and other stimulants act on neurotransmitters in the brain’s pleasure center, causing elation that is followed by depression as the effect subsides. Sometimes what appears to be major depression clears up after abstinence from alcohol or drugs. People with serious mood disorders also have twice the average rate of nicotine addiction, and many become depressed when they try to stop smoking.” Therefore, alcohol and substance use is associated with depression.

Conclusion

Based on this article, it can be proven that there are various types of mood disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, persistent depressive disorder, cyclothymia, as well as seasonal affective disorder. Based on this article, it can be proven that depression is the most common.

What Is A Mood Disorder?


Lauren Walters

My name is Lauren Walters. I am currently heading into my final semester of graduate school for Mental Health Counseling in the Spring of 2016. Through my own experiences with mental illness, I love to inspire others through my writings and reassure them that they can live healthy, productive lives, despite mental illness. I hope you enjoy my articles. Feel free to comment. I will be sure to respond to you questions and/or comments in a prompt manner. Enjoy!


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APA Reference
Walters, L. (2016). What Is A Mood Disorder?. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 15, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2016/03/what-is-a-mood-disorder/

 

Last updated: 26 Mar 2016
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